Category Archives: Fun Facts

Chicken Soup

Favorite Winter Comfort Foods

It’s Mmmmm Mmmmm good in the Winter!

It is the end of January here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, and there have been some very cold days lately, but that doesn’t stop our customers from shuttling in and out of their storage spaces. Lately I’ve noticed people storing holiday decorations, as well as removing exercise equipment, presumably in an effort to renew their commitment to better health in the new year.
Earlier this week, on a particularly cold day, one of our customers, Jodi, stopped Into the office to purchase some moving boxes for the items that she was putting into her eht storage unit. “Cold enough for you?” I asked. “I’m freezing” she answered  “I can’t wait to get home and have a nice bowl of hot soup!” she said as she took her boxes and headed to her car. Her soup sounded really good to me, so I decided to do a thoroughly unscientific polling of our customers as to their favorite winter comfort foods. Here some of our Storage Inn customer’s favorites!

bowl-of-soup1

Soup – Of course! Who doesn’t love a hot bowl of soup on a cold Winter’s day?  The two favorites seem to be chicken noodle, and tomato.

Hot ChocolateMmmmmm.. The real chocolaty kind with the tiny little marshmallows floating on top!  Not surprisingly, this one was offered up by one of our customer’s children.

Fried Chicken and Mashed PotatoesYes please – Make my chicken extra crispy!

Grilled Cheese – Cooked just right, so that the gooey cheese stretches between the two halves when you pull the sandwich apart!  These people should get together with the soup people.

winter-comfort-foods

Sloppy JoesWell, a burger is just a burger, but a sloppy joe, with a slice of American cheese – Now that’s comfort food!

Macaroni and Cheese – The cheesier the better – BTW goes well with sloppy joes!

Chicken Pot Pie – One of my favorites! I like mine with salt and pepper and a little bit of butter melted on the crust. Mmmmmm!

Spaghetti and Meatballs – A good choice any time of year, but really goes well at the end of a cold day spent outside.

Chili – There’s nothing like a simmering pot of chili. Whether you like it hot or mild, with meat or without, the combination of beans, onions, peppers, mushrooms and spices are impossible to resist when you’re cozy at home and it’s chilly outside.

Homemade Beef Stew  – You know, the type that simmers in the giant stew pot all day long, until the flavors of the beef, vegetables, and spices are mixed just right. Don’t forget the buttered rolls!

Well, there you have it – The official Storage Inn customer’s list of their favorite Winter Comfort Foods. Well, my shift is almost over, and I can’t wait to head home, but first I will be stopping off at the grocery store for Sloppy Joe mix, rolls, and hot chocolate – so much for my New Year’s diet!

Pop the Cork for 2021!!!

Storage Inn Blog Post Happy New Year 2021

The New Year is a upon us here at The Storage Inn self storage in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and our storage rental customers seem to be happy moving on to a new year!

Yesterday, one of our self-storage tenants who happens to be a wine aficionado, was at his rental storage unit, returning his holiday decorations to his storage space. “Hey Bob!” I called out – “What are we drinking for New Year’s Eve this year?”. ”Why champagne, of course!” came his reply. We wished each other good luck in the new year, and went on our way, but this made me think –  what is it about champagne that people love?

Champagne is synonymous with celebration, and nothing says New Year’s quite like popping a bottle of bubbly. Throughout the year it might be seen as slightly snobbish, but on December 31 Champagne becomes a holiday revelers’ drink of choice in countries all over the world. It seems that simply letting those bubbles fly sets the tone for a festive celebration.

Here are some fun facts about Champagne you likely never knew…

There are about 49 million bubbles in a 7500ml bottle of Champagne – A standard-sized glass emits 30 bubbles every second.

The French consume 162.5 million bottles of Champagne every year, or about 52 percent of the entire world’s production of Champagne.

Champagne has 3 times more carbonation than beer – The pressure in a Champagne bottle is about 3 times the amount of pressure of a car tire.

When popped, a Champagne cork can reach a velocity of 24.8 miles per hour – The longest recorded cork flight was 177 feet and 9 inches.

Marilyn Monroe famously took a bath in Champagne. More than 350 bottles were needed to fill up the tub.

About 28,000 bottles of champagne are served at Wimbledon every year.

James Bond has been spotted drinking Champagne more than 35 times in his films. It’s the drink he reaches for more than any other… (and we thought he was a Martini man)

CPJGDF Goldfinger

If you’re drinking good Champagne, you’ll be able to see the “collerette” or the bubble trains traveling up the sides of the glass.

The first glass of Champagne has the most bubbles, meaning the first glass will also get you feeling drunk the fastest. Every glass thereafter poured from that bottle will be less potent than the one preceding it.

Winston Churchill was one of the biggest Champagne drinkers on record.  Between 1908 and 1965 he drank an estimated 42,000 bottles. A special one pint bottle was served to him every day at precisely 11 a.m.

In the 19th century, Champagne makers wore metal masks to protect their faces when handling Champagne bottles, which had a tendency to explode. Eventually, stronger glass bottles and metal clasp closures made the stuff more stable.

The most expensive bottle of Champagne was $2.07 million. It was designed by Alexander Amosu and Swarovski, handcrafted from 18-carat solid gold, with a deep-cut 19-carat white diamond at its center. It was mostly the bottle that caused the hefty price tag. Only a few were ever made, making it a rare and valuable collectors edition.

So, there you have it – some Champagne knowledge that you can take with you into the new year, courtesy of The Storage Inn. As for me, I’m considering enjoying some Champagne this New Year’s Eve, but first I need to find out – does Champagne pair well with hot wings?

Happy New Year!

 

 

Happy Holidays From The Storage Inn

Happy Holidays From The Storage Inn

Thanksgiving & Moving to the New World

Here at The Storage Inn self storage in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, we tend to meet a lot of people who are in the process of moving. This made me think about the move that we celebrate every November here in the United States – The move made by the pilgrims, from Great Britain, to the new world! These brave souls, for all intents and purposes, loaded all of their worldly belongings into a floating self storage unit – the Mayflower, and set sail for their new home, not knowing if they would actually find it, or even survive the trip.

Eventually the pilgrims made it across the deep blue sea, and landed in what is now Plymouth Massachusetts, with dreams of beginning a new life. The pilgrims survived their first 10 months including barely surviving their first American winter. They had built seven houses, a small meeting hall, and three store houses. They called these three buildings “New World Self Storage” – Just kidding!  What they did do was to celebrate their first harvest, and having survived the winter, with a week long feast, during which they were joined by the Wampanoag Indian tribe.

Unlike our modern Thanksgiving, There was no Butterball turkey, or mashed potatoes, but instead, fish, duck, goose, venison, and vegetables such as onions, beans, lettuce, spinach, cabbage, and carrots. The feast likely included fruits and berries such as blueberries, plums, grapes, gooseberries, raspberries and, of course cranberries, which Native Americans ate and used as a natural dye. Historians are not certain whether there was a “kids table” at the first Thanksgiving, but if there was, you can rest assured that the words “ Stop throwing gooseberries at your sister!” were heard.

Today we celebrate Thanksgiving by gathering with family, eating until near explosion, and falling asleep as we “watch” football. So in the spirit of Thanksgiving… I must say I’m thankful for the Pilgrims, the Wampanoag Indians, and… Pepto-Bismol –  Hey, I have to get back to helping people find storage space after the holidays!

If you’d be thankful for a little extra space storage to store your stuff, please stop by and see us at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, NJ or The Storage Inn II in Ocean City, NJ – Happy Holidays!

It’s a BOO-tiful day in the Neighborhood!

Happy Halloween from The Storage Inn of EHT

It’s late October here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and Halloween is here! As the leaves begin to fall, we find our storage customers bustling about retrieving their last minute Halloween home and party decorations and costumes from their storage space.

Yesterday I saw one of our tenants at her storage space digging through Halloween items as her preteen daughter ran around her dressed as a ghost, making spooky noises. “Hey Stephanie” I yelled to her – “you’re being haunted!”. “I’ve been haunted by this one since the day she was born” Stephanie replied laughingly.

As I drove back to the storage rental office I was thinking about the stories I had heard of places that were supposedly haunted. In South Jersey we have many places including well known spots including the Pine Barrens and the Victorian City of Cape May that have this reputation. It made me wonder about the rest of the United States, and where the most haunted areas happen to be.

We’ve compiled a list of the 10 most haunted cities in America according to travelandleisure.com…

1. New Orleans, Louisiana 

New Orleans is one of the country’s most haunted cities. Stories include churches haunted by the spirits of former priests, soldiers who died but never truly passed on, and homes filled with ghosts – not to mention all the vampire stories. Notable ghosts include author William Faulkner, Andrew Jackson, and pirate Jean Lafitte. Old Absinthe House, open since the early 1800’s, is supposedly haunted by Voodoo practitioner Marie Laveau. St. Louis Cemetery is said to be haunted by hundreds of ghosts! These are just a few of the many spooky spots in New Orleans.

2. Chicago, Illinois  

Nederlander Theatre was the site of a tragic fire killing hundreds in 1903, and some say the alley behind the theater is still haunted by those unfortunate patrons. The site of the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, often attributed to Al Capone, reportedly has some residual paranormal energy too.

3. Savannah, Georgia

Savannah, Georgia, is often ranked among the most haunted cities in the USA. Visitors to Savannah can opt to stay at an allegedly haunted hotel and eat at the restaurants still frequented by spirits that never fully left the earthly realm. The Moon River Brewing Company has been featured on both Ghost Adventures and Ghost Hunters. Guests have reported seeing a lady in white on the stairs and spirits have been known to mess with the staff. The Pirates’ House restaurant was once a boarding house popular among sailors. Some say that their spirits still visit the restaurant today. Finally, The Marshall House is known as one of the most haunted hotels in the country. It was  a hospital during the Civil War and yellow fever epidemics. Guests have reported seeing apparitions in the hallways and hearing ghost children running down the halls at night, among other mysterious things.

4. St. Augustine, Florida

The oldest city in the U.S. is bound to have a residual spirit or two, and lucky for paranormal seekers, St. Augustine is a hotbed of ghost activity. The St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum is one of the historic city’s hot spots, supposedly haunted by girls who drowned there in the 1870s. Visitors have also reported paranormal experiences at Castle Warden, a Moorish-style home built in the 1880s that now houses the first permanent Ripley’s Believe It or Not! museum, established in 1950. The city has several other haunted locations; you can explore the darker side of St. Augustine on a ghost tour — some even bring along EMF meters to track paranormal activity.

5. Portland, Oregon

Portland, Oregon is one of the best destinations for ghost hunters. The Shanghai Tunnels are perhaps the most notoriously haunted site in the city — in the late 1800s, the city was a major international port, and underground tunnels were created to transport (often illegal) goods across Portland. According to local lore, residents hanging out at local bars were kidnapped and taken through the tunnels to waiting ships, never to be seen again. Some say the victims’ souls still haunt the bars above ground.

6. Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 

The site of the Civil War’s bloodiest battle is regarded as one of the world’s most haunted places. Some report seeing the ghosts of soldiers on the battlefield. Inns and a farm in the area are haunted, too, according to the Travel Channel. Visitors can take a ghost tour to learn more about the history of Gettysburg and the tragic spirits still said to wander these grounds.

7. Washington, D.C.

Many say the White House is one of the most haunted houses in the U.S., haunted by the ghosts of former residents. President Lincoln’s ghost has been spotted in the Lincoln Bedroom; President William Henry Harrison, who died in the White House, is said to have returned in the afterlife; and first ladies Dolly Madison and Abigail Adams supposedly still linger, tending to the home. D.C. ghost tours take visitors through other allegedly haunted locations, including the National Building Museum, the Congressional Cemetery, and official government buildings.

8. San Francisco, California

San Francisco is one of the most haunted cities in the U.S. – China Camp State Park, the USS Hornet, and the Mare Island Naval Shipyard are all said to be haunted, but the number one San Francisco hot spot has to be Alcatraz. According to the Travel Channel, there are a few ghosts still lurking in the infamous prison, but the spirit of Al Capone is perhaps the most notorious — some say you can still hear him playing his favorite banjo tunes.

9. Salem, Massachusetts 

Salem, Massachusetts, is said to be one of the most haunted cities in the U.S. Some say the ghosts of those killed during the Salem Witch trials still linger in Salem to this day — Lyceum Hall is allegedly haunted by the first victim of the trials, Bridget Bishop, according to Atlas Obscura, and Howard Street Cemetery is haunted by Giles Corey, who was tortured to death after being accused of witchcraft. You can learn more about Salem’s spooky side on one of the many ghost tours offered.

10. San Antonio, Texas

San Antonio is considered one of the most haunted places in Texas because of the city’s history. The Battle of the Alamo led to thousands of casualties, and Alamo visitors and employees have reported seeing the ghosts of soldiers and hearing mysterious rally cries. The nearby Emily Morgan Hotel is one of the country’s most haunted hotels, too. The property was once a hospital, and some guests now report seeing the apparition of a woman in white in the halls. 

So, there you have it, courtesy of The Storage Inn – 10 places that you can visit to scare yourself. By the way…Who knew Al Capone played the banjo?!?

Happy Halloween!

The Legend of the Jersey Devil

It’s October here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and our storage customers have been getting ready for Halloween. Just today I saw Jane, one of our long time storage renters, retrieving Halloween decorations and costumes from her extra space storage unit.

Halloween conjures up images of witches, ghosts, and skeletons –  but here in South Jersey, we have a particular affinity for devils. Most people know that our hockey team is called the Jersey Devils, but few know why.

They are named after the legend of the Jersey Devil, and although the hockey team plays in North Jersey, the legend of the Jersey Devil is deeply rooted in the southernmost portion of the state.

The legend of the Jersey Devil revolves around the Leeds family, whose descendants still live in South Jersey. And sightings of the Jersey, or “Leeds” devil, continue to be reported even in 2020!

To understand the legend of the Jersey Devil, you must first understand his birthplace. The remote region extending 1700 square miles across southeastern New Jersey is called the Pine Barrens. The Pine Barrens are are a dense pine forest broken up by the old stagecoach roads and Native American Indian Trails.

Leeds Point, NJ – On a stormy night in 1735, a Quaker woman gave birth to her thirteenth child during a thunderstorm. The impoverished woman, known as Mother Leeds, already had twelve children and had cursed the news of her being pregnant with her thirteenth. According to legend, on the night of the ill-fated birth, the room flickered with candlelight as the wind howled through the pines.

Some say the child was born deformed. Some say she cursed the child because of her dire straits. Other accounts say the child was born normal and took on odd characteristics later – characteristics such as an elongated body, winged shoulders, a large horse-like head, cloven feet and a thick tail. According to legend, the child was confined until it made its escape either out through the cellar door or up the chimney. Thus, the Jersey Devil was born.

Over the years, the Jersey Devil has been blamed for everything from crop failure to livestock death, damaging weather, and even reportedly causing local streams to boil. There have been hundreds of reports of sightings and encounters and even rewards offered for its capture. Every once in a while, a photograph turns up of this legendary monster.

If you’re ever in Southern New Jersey, you can take the “Tales of the Jersey Devil Walking Tour” through the Pine Barrens, if you dare.  Who knows – you may even have a Jersey Devil encounter of your own (have your camera ready!)

Happy Halloween from the Staff of The Storage Inn 

 

12 Fun Facts About September!

It’s September here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, and our storage tenants are getting in their last blasts of summer fun!

This week has been a parade of beach chairs, umbrellas, kayaks, bikes and much more being hauled in and out by our storage customers.

We all know that September starts off with the Labor Day celebration, but the staff here at The Storage Inn thought that you might enjoy a few fun facts about September – so here are a dozen of them!

1.The name “September” comes from an old Roman word, “septem,” which actually means 7. That’s right – September was the seventh month of the year on the Roman calendar – It did not become the ninth month until the advent of the Gregorian calendar.

2. The Romans believed that September was looked after by the god of fire. So they always expected fires and volcanic eruptions to occur during this month.

3. Out of all 12 months of the year, September is spelled with the most letters. It contains nine letters, and it happens to be the ninth month of the year. No other months have the same amount of letters as their number in the calendar year.

4. This September “Harvest Moon” is the fullest moon of the year.
When you gaze at it, it looks very large and gives a lot of light throughout the entire night. No other lunar spectacle is as awesome as the Harvest Moon.

5. The first day of fall is typically on September 22 or September 23 in North America. This is when the hours in the day are almost equal to the hours in the night.This occurs at the same time as the Spring Equinox does in Australia.

6. A little-known, but highly significant holiday falls in September. September 17th is Constitution Day, which marks the day that the U.S. Constitution was adopted.

7. There are more pop and classic songs with “September” in the title than any other month.

8. We all know that Labor Day is in September, but did you know that September also has a few  little known holidays? Among these are National Grandparent Day, National Cheese Pizza Day, and National Drink-a-Beer Day.

9. September is known as Harvest Month. It’s a great month to harvest in preparation for the coming winter months. In fact, in Old England, it was called “Haervest-monath”, meaning Harvest Month. Some of the best crops to harvest are onions, apples, raspberries, and tomatoes.

10. Zodiac signs in September are split between Virgo (August 23 – September 22) and Libra (September 23 – October 22).

Virgos are known for being loyal, practical, thoughtful, analytical people who sometimes come off as cold, but it’s only because they’re taking a methodical approach to friendship (like most aspects of their lives).

Libras are a little different. Their main characteristics include being diplomatic and fair. They like harmony, dislike being alone, and always strive for peace and justice in the world.

11. Famous people born in September include Adam Sandler, Amy Winehouse, Bill Murray, Bruce Springsteen, Confucius, Freddie Mercury, Queen Elizabeth, Stephen King, and Sophia Loren. 

12. The birthstone for September is the sapphire which is said to reduce inflammation, treat fever and act as a lucky charm for the person wearing it. It symbolizes intuition, clarity of thought, peacefulness, as well as loyalty and trust.

Okay – so now you are ready to go with some fun facts about the month of September courtesy of The Storage Inn. Now, if only National “Cheese Pizza Day”, and National “Drink a Beer Day” fell on the same date! Mmmmmmmmm!

 

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The Storage Inn team investigates the origins of popular sayings!

Biting the Bullet during The Dog Days of Summer

So, the “Dog Days of Summer” are officially upon us here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey. It’s been extremely hot and humid as we head out of July and into August. The “Dog Days of Summer” thing was brought up to me by one of our storage space  customers who also happens to be into astrology.  

I always assumed that this saying referred to the weather being so hot that even the family dog did not want to move out of his resting spot. But, Cindy, our astrological self storage client, informed me that the “dog days of summer” are the hot, sultry days of summer that coincide with the heliacal rising of the star Sirius (also known as the dog star) from late July to late August.

This got me to thinking about all of the sayings that we use, but probably have no idea where  they came from.

So being the detective that I am, I decided to investigate a few popular sayings.

“Bite the Bullet”

Meaning: Accepting something difficult or unpleasant
History: There was no time to administer anesthesia before emergency surgery during battle. The surgeon made patients bite down on a bullet in an attempt to distract them from the pain.

“Break the Ice”

Meaning: To commence a project or initiate a friendship
History: Before the days of trains or cars, port cities that thrived on trade suffered during the winter because frozen rivers prevented commercial ships from entering the city. Small ships known as “icebreakers” would rescue the icebound ships by breaking the ice and creating a path for them to follow. Before any type of business arrangement today, it is now customary to “break the ice” before beginning a project.

“Butter him/her Up”

Meaning: To flatter someone
History: An ancient Indian custom involved throwing balls of clarified butter at statues of the gods to seek favor.

“Caught Red Handed”

Meaning: To be caught doing something wrong
History: This saying originated because of a law. If someone butchered an animal that didn’t belong to him, he had to be caught with the animal’s blood on his hands to be convicted. Being caught with freshly cut meat did not make the person guilty.

Give him/her “The Cold Shoulder”

Meaning: A rude way of telling someone he isn’t welcome
History: Although giving someone the cold shoulder today is considered rude, it was actually regarded as a polite gesture in medieval England. After a feast, the host would let his guests know it was time to leave by giving them a cold piece of meat from the shoulder of beef, mutton, or pork.

“Cold Turkey”

Meaning: To quit something abruptly
History: People believed that during withdrawal, the skin of drug addicts became translucent, hard to the touch, and covered with goose bumps – like the skin of a plucked turkey.

“Kick the Bucket”

Meaning: To die
History: When a cow was killed at a slaughterhouse, a bucket was placed under it while it was positioned on a pulley. Sometimes the animal’s legs would kick during the adjustment of the rope and it would literally kick the bucket before being killed.

“No Spring Chicken”

Meaning: Someone who is past his prime
History: New England chicken farmers generally sold chickens in the spring, so the chickens born in the springtime yielded better earnings than the chickens that survived the winter. Sometimes, farmers tried to sell old birds for the price of a new spring chicken. Clever buyers complained that the fowl was “no spring chicken,” and the term came to represent anyone past their prime.

“Rule of Thumb”

Meaning: A common, ubiquitous benchmark
History: Legend has it that 17th century English Judge Sir Francis Buller ruled it was permissible for a husband to beat his wife with a stick, given that the stick was no wider than his thumb.

“Saved by the Bell”

Meaning: Rescued from an unwanted situation
History: As scary as it sounds, being buried alive was once a common occurrence. People who feared succumbing to such a fate were buried in special coffins that connected to a bell above ground. At night, guards listened for any bells in case they had to dig up a living person and save them “by the bell.”

“Sleep Tight”

Meaning: Sleep well
History: During Shakespeare’s time, mattresses were secured on bed frames by ropes. In order to make the bed firmer, one had to pull the ropes to tighten the mattress.

So in conclusion, let me Break The Ice by inviting you to visit The Storage Inn for all of your self storage and packing needs. We promise not to give you The Cold Shoulder, and may even Butter You Up a bit – and if you rent from us, you’ll be able to Sleep Tight, knowing that all of your items are safe & secure!!

Enjoy the rest of your summer!!

 

August is Family Fun Month!

Storage Inn Summer Fun

August is Family Fun Month!

It’s mid August here at The Storage Inn self storage in Atlantic County, New Jersey, and our storage rental customers are in full summer mode – retrieving items from their rental unit spaces including grills, lawn chairs, kayaks, and much more! I did not know this until one of our storage customers pointed it out to me, but August is officially Family Fun month. 

Picture the perfect summer and you might envision barbecues with friends, pool parties, and sightseeing vacations. There’s always plenty to look forward to during the season of sun, but with Covid changing the available and acceptable activities, summer 2020 may look a bit different than usual.

Despite canceled concerts, cruises, and camps, with a little creativity, it’s still possible to have a fun summer as a family. We’ve rounded up a list of alternatives for activities that might be taking a hiatus this summer. Here are some options to make this season one to remember.

Pool Closed!

Swimming is synonymous with summer—but social distancing may mean limited access to public or community pools this year. If your go-to swimming spot is closed, consider these options…

Provided you have yard space, go old-school, and haul out a lawn sprinkler for kids to run around in. You might even get the urge and run through it yourself.

Get an inexpensive backyard pool. It may not be the height of luxury, but in a pinch, an inexpensive kiddie pool is better than nothing! 

Have a squirt gun fight — sometimes you don’t feel like taking the whole plunge into a pool, anyway. Spritz each other with squirt guns instead!

Vacation Canceled!

A summer without vacation may sound like a major bummer, especially if travel is a family tradition. Save a little time and money by choosing to “vacation” with these alternatives…

Backyard Camping! Roast marshmallows, tell spooky stories, and spend the night under the stars—right in your own backyard. 

Take a Staycation. Your very own hometown (or one close by) can be a surprising source of interest and fun. Make a list of the popular attractions in your area you’ve never visited – See how many of them you can hit this summer.

Take a Virtual Tour. Famous sites and world-class museums all over the world have jumped on the virtual bandwagon during Covid-19. Destinations like the battlefields at Gettysburg, the Louvre, and the Smithsonian now have tours available online. Take an educational “trip” as a family to any of these bucket list attractions.

Enjoy the great outdoors. After months of quarantine, we could all probably use more fresh air. Have a picnic, take a hike, ride a bike or go for a scenic drive. 

When Camp Is Cancelled 

Well, no summer day camp this year, so on to plan B. Perhaps this summer can be an opportunity to help kids learn real-world skills at home.  

Have a morning workout. Summer camp or no, kids need physical activity! Schedule a time each day for exercise, whether a bike ride, a walk, a dance party, or a kid-friendly Youtube workout video.

Bring on the board games. Large-group games may be out of the question at the moment, but board games are still on the table (figuratively and literally). This classic family pastime has a hidden benefit: Board games can be good for kids’ linguistic, cognitive, and social development.

Get Cookin’. If there’s one skill your child will always use, it’s cooking. Spending time together learning about ingredients and food preparation is often just as much fun as eating the outcome when it’s ready! Don’t get overwhelmed with complicated recipes, try something easy or give your kids simple tasks that aid in the overall process. Make it fun.

Try a science experiment. Everyday household items like baking soda, vinegar, and food coloring are fair game for science experiments for kids of any age. Find your next project on websites like Science Fun and Science Bob. 

Movie Madness

Grab your popcorn and turn down the lights! While indoor theaters are closed, you can make the best of movie night with these alternative options…

Go to a Drive-in! In the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic, drive-in movie theaters around the country have been doing a booming business. Catch the vintage vibe by checking one out. 

Read then Watch. Read the book, then watch the movie as a family. then take a family vote on which was better – the movie or the book? 

Have a weekly theme. Choose a theme for each week’s viewing – comedy one week, horror the next, and maybe a buddy movie the following week.

So, as you can see, these are just a small sample of all the fun and wonderful things to do even with social distancing guidelines in place. Hopefully, these tips, courtesy of The Storage Inn, will help to make the remainder of your summer more enjoyable. Happy Family Fun Month!

Baby, It’s Hot Outside!

Happy August everyone! Here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, the temps are soaring along with the humidity. Our storage space customers, however, seem to be immune to this weather as they check in on their storage rental spaces, retrieving various Summer fun time items. Yesterday I noticed one of our storage tenants, Bob, outside his storage rental unit with giant black inner tubes over each shoulder and carrying a large cooler. “What are you up to?” I shouted from my golf cart. “We’re going tubing – If we don’t sweat to death first!” came Bob’s reply. “ Yep – Dog days of summer!” I yelled back.

 

Bob threw the inner tubes and the cooler in the back of his pickup truck and drove away, leading me to wonder if one really could sweat to death, and what the heck does the saying “Dog days of summer” actually mean? I decided to look into this matter and came up with a handful of Summer sayings that needed some clarification.

Dog Days of Summer
I always assumed that this saying referred to the weather being so hot that even the family dog did not want to move out of his resting spot. But, it turns out that the “dog days of summer” are the hot, sultry days of summer that coincide with the heliacal rising of the star Sirius (also known as the dog star) from late July to late August.

It’s hot enough to fry an egg on the sidewalk
Sure, the sidewalk gets hot, but it’s unlikely to cook the egg much, if at all. If you really want to fry an egg outside on a hot day,
you might have better luck with the hood of a car. Metal conducts heat better and gets much hotter.

Have a hot drink to cool you down?
On a scorching summer day, you’re probably more likely to grab an iced coffee than a steaming cup of joe. But a study has shown that drinking a hot beverage on a hot day actually can cool  you down. Consuming a hot drink does add heat to your body, but that heat actually increases the rate at which you sweat, which can help cool you off. The sweat has to evaporate in order for you to feel cooler, so, if you’re wearing shorts and a t-shirt, hot coffee might actually cool you off more than a glass of ice-cold coffee.

It’s not the heat, it’s the humidity
There’s a reason for the adage: It’s not the heat, it’s the humidity. “It’s really the dew point that is the measure of how humans feel outside,” according to Carlie Buccola, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service. When the dew point or humidity is high, that means the air is already saturated with moisture and your sweat has a harder time evaporating. So, it’s really both – heat without humidity can be bearable, as can a cool day with some moisture in the air.

I’m sweating to death!

Is it possible to sweat to death? Literally no. Sort of yes. The cause of death in every single human death is exactly the same. Lack of oxygen to the brain. Sweating is fluid being taken from your blood, and pushed out of your skin to cool you off when your body feels like its core temp is too high. Your body will lose the ability to sweat after your fluid level reaches a certain point, and your kidneys have gone into refiltration mode. (kidneys stop filtering urine down, and hold on to excess fluid in a desperate attempt to save your life) So no – it’s not possible to sweat to death. And even if you could, the cause of death would still be lack of blood to the brain.

So, there you have it, some interesting facts about summer sayings courtesy of The Storage Inn. As for me, I’m going to fix myself a nice big cup of hot coffee before I sweat to death!  

 

 

July is National Picnic Month!

July is National Picnic Month!

Summer is in full swing here at The Storage Inn In Egg Harbor Township New Jersey,  and our storage rental tenants are busy retrieving summer items from their rental spaces. Today I saw one of our long-time tenants pulling a giant picnic basket and blanket out of her storage space.

She informed me that July is National Picnic Month.  “What a great way to take a break from the current world situation!” I replied as we went our separate ways.

I began to wonder – Where did the idea of the picnic originate? Could it be simply an instinctual holdover from when primitive people lived outdoors? Here are some picnic facts that you may find interesting…

Picnic History

The start of this simple tradition may date back to hunting expeditions of the Middle Ages. Hunters would bring a meal to enjoy in the great outdoors. We can imagine a medieval hunting party taking an afternoon break in the shade of oak trees and enjoying a simple meal before continuing their expedition.

The earliest form of the word ‘picnic’ didn’t appear until 1692 – and was first documented in the French language. Then in 1748, a little more than 50 years later, the term found its way into the English language in a letter from Lord Chesterfield to his son, in reference to an outdoor social get-together.

From then on picnics have been held on blankets, in lawn chairs, aboard boats, and at picnic tables on both sides of the Atlantic. The term is now synonymous with relaxed outdoor dining, time spent with a special someone or a large group of friends, and simple fare like sandwiches or hot items fresh off the park grill.

A checked red-and-white blanket, a wicker basket, and an open patch of grass may be the quintessential concept of the classic picnic. But imagine trying to enjoy an afternoon of delight with these classic components – and three hungry children in tow, plus Grandma, a puppy dog, and a sore back from sitting in an office chair all week. That patch of grass may not be looking so inviting after all.

Upgrading to Tables

Enter a modern convenience often taken for granted: picnic tables. All of the wrinkles in your picnic problem have suddenly been released. Give the kids a spot to sit on the benches along either side of the table – and now Grandma has a spot to rest too. The dog stays out of the way of the tempting treats. And you can spread out the feast, then take a place at the picnic table yourself. With your meal above ground zero, you’ll spend less time combating the army of ants, too!

Classic fables evoke images of Robin Hood and his friends dining under trees during ‘picnics,’ but thousands of park-goers during National Picnic month will skip the storybook setting and opt to enjoy their meal on a picnic table in their favorite park.

Picnic Tips

The beautiful thing about a picnic is its versatility. Make it simple or sophisticated. Spend days planning the perfect party, or minutes packing the essentials for some impromptu fun! But no matter which route you go in your picnic planning, here are some tips for a perfect picnic

Keep an Eye on the Sky –  Summer showers can put a damper on your picnic plans, so check the weather for the day of your picnic. If it looks like a light shower might be rolling through, choose a park with covered picnic tables to serve as a back-up plan in the event of rain. But beware of thunderstorms – and stay safe if lightning has been spotted in the area.

Keep it Clean –  Don’t leave your trash behind and ruin the park experience for others. Keep an eye on wrappers, napkins, and paper cups which can easily be blown away by a breeze. Bring a small bag to collect refuse, and make use of trash receptacles in your local park. Remember, litter encourages more litter and a few paper plates on the ground could start a landslide of trash.

Cold is Cool  –  The summer season is a perfect time for picnics, but the warm temperatures mean that you’ll want to take extra precautions to keep your food from spoiling. Bring along plenty of ice packs and a cooler to store food and condiments in. If you’re making hot food fresh on the park grill, then don’t let it linger too long in the hot summer sun after you’ve cooked it.

Try a New View –  Celebrate National Picnic month by choosing a new spot for your outdoor feast. Whether it’s a park in your local community or a destination you’ll need to put in a little effort to reach, you’ll be rewarded with new views as you enjoy your meal. 

Pack up and picnic on!

So what are you waiting for? The staff here at The Storage Inn wishes you a happy rest of the summer – Whether you choose to dine in the grass, or on a picnic table, pack up and picnic on!