Category Archives: Fun Facts

12 Fun Facts About September!

It’s September here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, and our storage tenants are getting in their last blasts of summer fun!

This week has been a parade of beach chairs, umbrellas, kayaks, bikes and much more being hauled in and out by our storage customers.

We all know that September starts off with the Labor Day celebration, but the staff here at The Storage Inn thought that you might enjoy a few fun facts about September – so here are a dozen of them!

1.The name “September” comes from an old Roman word, “septem,” which actually means 7. That’s right – September was the seventh month of the year on the Roman calendar – It did not become the ninth month until the advent of the Gregorian calendar.

2. The Romans believed that September was looked after by the god of fire. So they always expected fires and volcanic eruptions to occur during this month.

3. Out of all 12 months of the year, September is spelled with the most letters. It contains nine letters, and it happens to be the ninth month of the year. No other months have the same amount of letters as their number in the calendar year.

4. This September “Harvest Moon” is the fullest moon of the year.
When you gaze at it, it looks very large and gives a lot of light throughout the entire night. No other lunar spectacle is as awesome as the Harvest Moon.

5. The first day of fall is typically on September 22 or September 23 in North America. This is when the hours in the day are almost equal to the hours in the night.This occurs at the same time as the Spring Equinox does in Australia.

6. A little-known, but highly significant holiday falls in September. September 17th is Constitution Day, which marks the day that the U.S. Constitution was adopted.

7. There are more pop and classic songs with “September” in the title than any other month.

8. We all know that Labor Day is in September, but did you know that September also has a few  little known holidays? Among these are National Grandparent Day, National Cheese Pizza Day, and National Drink-a-Beer Day.

9. September is known as Harvest Month. It’s a great month to harvest in preparation for the coming winter months. In fact, in Old England, it was called “Haervest-monath”, meaning Harvest Month. Some of the best crops to harvest are onions, apples, raspberries, and tomatoes.

10. Zodiac signs in September are split between Virgo (August 23 – September 22) and Libra (September 23 – October 22).

Virgos are known for being loyal, practical, thoughtful, analytical people who sometimes come off as cold, but it’s only because they’re taking a methodical approach to friendship (like most aspects of their lives).

Libras are a little different. Their main characteristics include being diplomatic and fair. They like harmony, dislike being alone, and always strive for peace and justice in the world.

11. Famous people born in September include Adam Sandler, Amy Winehouse, Bill Murray, Bruce Springsteen, Confucius, Freddie Mercury, Queen Elizabeth, Stephen King, and Sophia Loren. 

12. The birthstone for September is the sapphire which is said to reduce inflammation, treat fever and act as a lucky charm for the person wearing it. It symbolizes intuition, clarity of thought, peacefulness, as well as loyalty and trust.

Okay – so now you are ready to go with some fun facts about the month of September courtesy of The Storage Inn. Now, if only National “Cheese Pizza Day”, and National “Drink a Beer Day” fell on the same date! Mmmmmmmmm!

 

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The Storage Inn team investigates the origins of popular sayings!

Biting the Bullet during The Dog Days of Summer

So, the “Dog Days of Summer” are officially upon us here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey. It’s been extremely hot and humid as we head out of July and into August. The “Dog Days of Summer” thing was brought up to me by one of our storage space  customers who also happens to be into astrology.  

I always assumed that this saying referred to the weather being so hot that even the family dog did not want to move out of his resting spot. But, Cindy, our astrological self storage client, informed me that the “dog days of summer” are the hot, sultry days of summer that coincide with the heliacal rising of the star Sirius (also known as the dog star) from late July to late August.

This got me to thinking about all of the sayings that we use, but probably have no idea where  they came from.

So being the detective that I am, I decided to investigate a few popular sayings.

“Bite the Bullet”

Meaning: Accepting something difficult or unpleasant
History: There was no time to administer anesthesia before emergency surgery during battle. The surgeon made patients bite down on a bullet in an attempt to distract them from the pain.

“Break the Ice”

Meaning: To commence a project or initiate a friendship
History: Before the days of trains or cars, port cities that thrived on trade suffered during the winter because frozen rivers prevented commercial ships from entering the city. Small ships known as “icebreakers” would rescue the icebound ships by breaking the ice and creating a path for them to follow. Before any type of business arrangement today, it is now customary to “break the ice” before beginning a project.

“Butter him/her Up”

Meaning: To flatter someone
History: An ancient Indian custom involved throwing balls of clarified butter at statues of the gods to seek favor.

“Caught Red Handed”

Meaning: To be caught doing something wrong
History: This saying originated because of a law. If someone butchered an animal that didn’t belong to him, he had to be caught with the animal’s blood on his hands to be convicted. Being caught with freshly cut meat did not make the person guilty.

Give him/her “The Cold Shoulder”

Meaning: A rude way of telling someone he isn’t welcome
History: Although giving someone the cold shoulder today is considered rude, it was actually regarded as a polite gesture in medieval England. After a feast, the host would let his guests know it was time to leave by giving them a cold piece of meat from the shoulder of beef, mutton, or pork.

“Cold Turkey”

Meaning: To quit something abruptly
History: People believed that during withdrawal, the skin of drug addicts became translucent, hard to the touch, and covered with goose bumps – like the skin of a plucked turkey.

“Kick the Bucket”

Meaning: To die
History: When a cow was killed at a slaughterhouse, a bucket was placed under it while it was positioned on a pulley. Sometimes the animal’s legs would kick during the adjustment of the rope and it would literally kick the bucket before being killed.

“No Spring Chicken”

Meaning: Someone who is past his prime
History: New England chicken farmers generally sold chickens in the spring, so the chickens born in the springtime yielded better earnings than the chickens that survived the winter. Sometimes, farmers tried to sell old birds for the price of a new spring chicken. Clever buyers complained that the fowl was “no spring chicken,” and the term came to represent anyone past their prime.

“Rule of Thumb”

Meaning: A common, ubiquitous benchmark
History: Legend has it that 17th century English Judge Sir Francis Buller ruled it was permissible for a husband to beat his wife with a stick, given that the stick was no wider than his thumb.

“Saved by the Bell”

Meaning: Rescued from an unwanted situation
History: As scary as it sounds, being buried alive was once a common occurrence. People who feared succumbing to such a fate were buried in special coffins that connected to a bell above ground. At night, guards listened for any bells in case they had to dig up a living person and save them “by the bell.”

“Sleep Tight”

Meaning: Sleep well
History: During Shakespeare’s time, mattresses were secured on bed frames by ropes. In order to make the bed firmer, one had to pull the ropes to tighten the mattress.

So in conclusion, let me Break The Ice by inviting you to visit The Storage Inn for all of your self storage and packing needs. We promise not to give you The Cold Shoulder, and may even Butter You Up a bit – and if you rent from us, you’ll be able to Sleep Tight, knowing that all of your items are safe & secure!!

Enjoy the rest of your summer!!

 

August is Family Fun Month!

Storage Inn Summer Fun

August is Family Fun Month!

It’s mid August here at The Storage Inn self storage in Atlantic County, New Jersey, and our storage rental customers are in full summer mode – retrieving items from their rental unit spaces including grills, lawn chairs, kayaks, and much more! I did not know this until one of our storage customers pointed it out to me, but August is officially Family Fun month. 

Picture the perfect summer and you might envision barbecues with friends, pool parties, and sightseeing vacations. There’s always plenty to look forward to during the season of sun, but with Covid changing the available and acceptable activities, summer 2020 may look a bit different than usual.

Despite canceled concerts, cruises, and camps, with a little creativity, it’s still possible to have a fun summer as a family. We’ve rounded up a list of alternatives for activities that might be taking a hiatus this summer. Here are some options to make this season one to remember.

Pool Closed!

Swimming is synonymous with summer—but social distancing may mean limited access to public or community pools this year. If your go-to swimming spot is closed, consider these options…

Provided you have yard space, go old-school, and haul out a lawn sprinkler for kids to run around in. You might even get the urge and run through it yourself.

Get an inexpensive backyard pool. It may not be the height of luxury, but in a pinch, an inexpensive kiddie pool is better than nothing! 

Have a squirt gun fight — sometimes you don’t feel like taking the whole plunge into a pool, anyway. Spritz each other with squirt guns instead!

Vacation Canceled!

A summer without vacation may sound like a major bummer, especially if travel is a family tradition. Save a little time and money by choosing to “vacation” with these alternatives…

Backyard Camping! Roast marshmallows, tell spooky stories, and spend the night under the stars—right in your own backyard. 

Take a Staycation. Your very own hometown (or one close by) can be a surprising source of interest and fun. Make a list of the popular attractions in your area you’ve never visited – See how many of them you can hit this summer.

Take a Virtual Tour. Famous sites and world-class museums all over the world have jumped on the virtual bandwagon during Covid-19. Destinations like the battlefields at Gettysburg, the Louvre, and the Smithsonian now have tours available online. Take an educational “trip” as a family to any of these bucket list attractions.

Enjoy the great outdoors. After months of quarantine, we could all probably use more fresh air. Have a picnic, take a hike, ride a bike or go for a scenic drive. 

When Camp Is Cancelled 

Well, no summer day camp this year, so on to plan B. Perhaps this summer can be an opportunity to help kids learn real-world skills at home.  

Have a morning workout. Summer camp or no, kids need physical activity! Schedule a time each day for exercise, whether a bike ride, a walk, a dance party, or a kid-friendly Youtube workout video.

Bring on the board games. Large-group games may be out of the question at the moment, but board games are still on the table (figuratively and literally). This classic family pastime has a hidden benefit: Board games can be good for kids’ linguistic, cognitive, and social development.

Get Cookin’. If there’s one skill your child will always use, it’s cooking. Spending time together learning about ingredients and food preparation is often just as much fun as eating the outcome when it’s ready! Don’t get overwhelmed with complicated recipes, try something easy or give your kids simple tasks that aid in the overall process. Make it fun.

Try a science experiment. Everyday household items like baking soda, vinegar, and food coloring are fair game for science experiments for kids of any age. Find your next project on websites like Science Fun and Science Bob. 

Movie Madness

Grab your popcorn and turn down the lights! While indoor theaters are closed, you can make the best of movie night with these alternative options…

Go to a Drive-in! In the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic, drive-in movie theaters around the country have been doing a booming business. Catch the vintage vibe by checking one out. 

Read then Watch. Read the book, then watch the movie as a family. then take a family vote on which was better – the movie or the book? 

Have a weekly theme. Choose a theme for each week’s viewing – comedy one week, horror the next, and maybe a buddy movie the following week.

So, as you can see, these are just a small sample of all the fun and wonderful things to do even with social distancing guidelines in place. Hopefully, these tips, courtesy of The Storage Inn, will help to make the remainder of your summer more enjoyable. Happy Family Fun Month!

Baby, It’s Hot Outside!

Happy August everyone! Here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, the temps are soaring along with the humidity. Our storage space customers, however, seem to be immune to this weather as they check in on their storage rental spaces, retrieving various Summer fun time items. Yesterday I noticed one of our storage tenants, Bob, outside his storage rental unit with giant black inner tubes over each shoulder and carrying a large cooler. “What are you up to?” I shouted from my golf cart. “We’re going tubing – If we don’t sweat to death first!” came Bob’s reply. “ Yep – Dog days of summer!” I yelled back.

 

Bob threw the inner tubes and the cooler in the back of his pickup truck and drove away, leading me to wonder if one really could sweat to death, and what the heck does the saying “Dog days of summer” actually mean? I decided to look into this matter and came up with a handful of Summer sayings that needed some clarification.

Dog Days of Summer
I always assumed that this saying referred to the weather being so hot that even the family dog did not want to move out of his resting spot. But, it turns out that the “dog days of summer” are the hot, sultry days of summer that coincide with the heliacal rising of the star Sirius (also known as the dog star) from late July to late August.

It’s hot enough to fry an egg on the sidewalk
Sure, the sidewalk gets hot, but it’s unlikely to cook the egg much, if at all. If you really want to fry an egg outside on a hot day,
you might have better luck with the hood of a car. Metal conducts heat better and gets much hotter.

Have a hot drink to cool you down?
On a scorching summer day, you’re probably more likely to grab an iced coffee than a steaming cup of joe. But a study has shown that drinking a hot beverage on a hot day actually can cool  you down. Consuming a hot drink does add heat to your body, but that heat actually increases the rate at which you sweat, which can help cool you off. The sweat has to evaporate in order for you to feel cooler, so, if you’re wearing shorts and a t-shirt, hot coffee might actually cool you off more than a glass of ice-cold coffee.

It’s not the heat, it’s the humidity
There’s a reason for the adage: It’s not the heat, it’s the humidity. “It’s really the dew point that is the measure of how humans feel outside,” according to Carlie Buccola, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service. When the dew point or humidity is high, that means the air is already saturated with moisture and your sweat has a harder time evaporating. So, it’s really both – heat without humidity can be bearable, as can a cool day with some moisture in the air.

I’m sweating to death!

Is it possible to sweat to death? Literally no. Sort of yes. The cause of death in every single human death is exactly the same. Lack of oxygen to the brain. Sweating is fluid being taken from your blood, and pushed out of your skin to cool you off when your body feels like its core temp is too high. Your body will lose the ability to sweat after your fluid level reaches a certain point, and your kidneys have gone into refiltration mode. (kidneys stop filtering urine down, and hold on to excess fluid in a desperate attempt to save your life) So no – it’s not possible to sweat to death. And even if you could, the cause of death would still be lack of blood to the brain.

So, there you have it, some interesting facts about summer sayings courtesy of The Storage Inn. As for me, I’m going to fix myself a nice big cup of hot coffee before I sweat to death!  

 

 

July is National Picnic Month!

July is National Picnic Month!

Summer is in full swing here at The Storage Inn In Egg Harbor Township New Jersey,  and our storage rental tenants are busy retrieving summer items from their rental spaces. Today I saw one of our long-time tenants pulling a giant picnic basket and blanket out of her storage space.

She informed me that July is National Picnic Month.  “What a great way to take a break from the current world situation!” I replied as we went our separate ways.

I began to wonder – Where did the idea of the picnic originate? Could it be simply an instinctual holdover from when primitive people lived outdoors? Here are some picnic facts that you may find interesting…

Picnic History

The start of this simple tradition may date back to hunting expeditions of the Middle Ages. Hunters would bring a meal to enjoy in the great outdoors. We can imagine a medieval hunting party taking an afternoon break in the shade of oak trees and enjoying a simple meal before continuing their expedition.

The earliest form of the word ‘picnic’ didn’t appear until 1692 – and was first documented in the French language. Then in 1748, a little more than 50 years later, the term found its way into the English language in a letter from Lord Chesterfield to his son, in reference to an outdoor social get-together.

From then on picnics have been held on blankets, in lawn chairs, aboard boats, and at picnic tables on both sides of the Atlantic. The term is now synonymous with relaxed outdoor dining, time spent with a special someone or a large group of friends, and simple fare like sandwiches or hot items fresh off the park grill.

A checked red-and-white blanket, a wicker basket, and an open patch of grass may be the quintessential concept of the classic picnic. But imagine trying to enjoy an afternoon of delight with these classic components – and three hungry children in tow, plus Grandma, a puppy dog, and a sore back from sitting in an office chair all week. That patch of grass may not be looking so inviting after all.

Upgrading to Tables

Enter a modern convenience often taken for granted: picnic tables. All of the wrinkles in your picnic problem have suddenly been released. Give the kids a spot to sit on the benches along either side of the table – and now Grandma has a spot to rest too. The dog stays out of the way of the tempting treats. And you can spread out the feast, then take a place at the picnic table yourself. With your meal above ground zero, you’ll spend less time combating the army of ants, too!

Classic fables evoke images of Robin Hood and his friends dining under trees during ‘picnics,’ but thousands of park-goers during National Picnic month will skip the storybook setting and opt to enjoy their meal on a picnic table in their favorite park.

Picnic Tips

The beautiful thing about a picnic is its versatility. Make it simple or sophisticated. Spend days planning the perfect party, or minutes packing the essentials for some impromptu fun! But no matter which route you go in your picnic planning, here are some tips for a perfect picnic

Keep an Eye on the Sky –  Summer showers can put a damper on your picnic plans, so check the weather for the day of your picnic. If it looks like a light shower might be rolling through, choose a park with covered picnic tables to serve as a back-up plan in the event of rain. But beware of thunderstorms – and stay safe if lightning has been spotted in the area.

Keep it Clean –  Don’t leave your trash behind and ruin the park experience for others. Keep an eye on wrappers, napkins, and paper cups which can easily be blown away by a breeze. Bring a small bag to collect refuse, and make use of trash receptacles in your local park. Remember, litter encourages more litter and a few paper plates on the ground could start a landslide of trash.

Cold is Cool  –  The summer season is a perfect time for picnics, but the warm temperatures mean that you’ll want to take extra precautions to keep your food from spoiling. Bring along plenty of ice packs and a cooler to store food and condiments in. If you’re making hot food fresh on the park grill, then don’t let it linger too long in the hot summer sun after you’ve cooked it.

Try a New View –  Celebrate National Picnic month by choosing a new spot for your outdoor feast. Whether it’s a park in your local community or a destination you’ll need to put in a little effort to reach, you’ll be rewarded with new views as you enjoy your meal. 

Pack up and picnic on!

So what are you waiting for? The staff here at The Storage Inn wishes you a happy rest of the summer – Whether you choose to dine in the grass, or on a picnic table, pack up and picnic on!

July 4th – Independence Day – Fun Facts

Summer is here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and our storage space customers are preparing for the Independence Day Holiday, shuttling in and out past the rental office, retrieving barbecue grills, lawn furniture, and even the occasional kayak. I’m certain our staff, and storage space tenants could tell you that July 4th commemorates our nation’s freedom and the signing of the Declaration of Independence, but they may not know these facts about the 4th of July.

Here are a few July 4th fun facts for you courtesy of The Storage Inn…

Only John Hancock actually signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. All the others signed sometime in August..

The average age of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence was 45. The youngest was Thomas Lynch, Jr (27) of South Carolina.  The oldest delegate was Benjamin Franklin (70) of Pennsylvania. The lead author of The Declaration, Thomas Jefferson, was 33.

The Declaration of Independence was signed by 56 men from 13 colonies.One out of every eight signers of the Declaration of Independence were educated at Harvard (7 total).

The only two signers of the Declaration of Independence who later served as President of the United States were John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

The stars on the original American flag were in a circle so all the Colonies would appear equal.

The first Independence Day celebration took place in Philadelphia on July 8, 1776. This was also the day that the Declaration of Independence was first read in public after people were summoned by the ringing of the Liberty Bell.

The White House held its first 4th July party in 1801.

President John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe all died on the Fourth. Adams and Jefferson (both signed the Declaration) died on the same day within hours of each other in 1826.

Benjamin Franklin proposed the turkey as the national bird but was overruled by John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, who recommended the bald eagle.

In 1776, there were 2.5 million people living in the new nation. Today the population of the U.S.A. is over 300 million.

Congress made Independence Day an official unpaid holiday for federal employees in 1870. In 1938, Congress changed Independence Day to a paid federal holiday.

Over 200 million dollars are spent on fireworks annually in the United States with most being imported from China.

Approximately 150 million hot dogs and 700 million pounds of chicken are consumed  on the fourth of July

Every 4th of July the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia is tapped (not actually rung) thirteen times in honor of the original thirteen colonies.

The song “Yankee Doodle” was originally sung by British military officers to mock the disheveled, disorganized colonial “Yankees” with whom they served in the French and Indian War.

The tune of The Star Spangled Banner was originally that of an English drinking song called “To Anacreon in Heaven.”

So there you have it – some fun facts to entertain friends and family as you hang out at the beach or barbecue. Have a great 4th and remember to toast the Chinese for inventing fireworks!

Summertime Storage and Fun Summer Facts!

Hello Summer Storage

Summertime Storage and Fun Summer Facts!

Summer is officially here in Egg Harbor Township, NJ and The Storage Inn is bustling with warm weather activity. Landscaping storage customers are shooting in and out, retrieving items from their storage spaces. Families are grabbing barbecue grills, surfboards, and bicycles from their summer storage rentals, and I even saw one of our younger self storage tenants on roller blades!

Everybody loves to be busy in summer! To celebrate, I’d like to share a few interesting facts about summer with our readers.

  1. In the United States, the top 5 most popular summer vacations are
    – Beach/ocean (45%)
    – A famous city (42%)
    – National parks (21%)
    – A lake (17%)
    – A resort (14%) 

2. The “dog days of summer” refer to the weeks between July 3 and August 11 and are named after the Dog Star (Sirius) in the Canis Major constellation. The ancient Greeks blamed Sirius for the hot temperatures, drought, discomfort, and sickness that occurred during the summer. 

3. In the summer heat, the iron in France’s Eiffel Tower expands, making the tower grow more than 6 inches. 

4. The month of June was named after Juno, the wife of Jupiter. July is named after Julius Caesar, and August after Caesar Augustus. 

5. The first Olympic Games in the modern era were the 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the Olympiad in Athens, Greece. The Games featured the Panathinaiko Stadium, the first giant stadium of the modern world that housed the largest crowd to ever watch a sporting event. 

6. Watermelon, a summer time favorite, is part of the cucumber, pumpkin, and squash family and consists of 92% water. On average, Americans consume 15 pounds of watermelon annually. 

7. The popsicle, another summer time treat, was accidentally invented by an 11-year-old boy in San Francisco in 1905 during the cooler part of the year. He left a glass of soda sitting outside and by the next morning it had frozen solid. A little time later in life he began selling them at an amusement park in New Jersey. Cherry is the number 1 popsicle flavor in the United States.

8. Before the Civil War, schools did not have summer vacation. In rural communities, kids had school off during the spring planting and fall harvest while urban schools were essentially year-round. The long summer holiday didn’t come about until the early 20th century. 

9. The record for the most people applying sunscreen was on January 8, 2012, in Australia with 1,006 participants applying sunscreen for 2 minutes. 

There you have it – A few things that you may not have known about Summer! Happy Summer everyone from all of us here at The Storage Inn!

 

Look Twice – Save a Life!

It’s mid-May here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and we are starting to get some warm, almost summer-like days. This time of year the air is filled with the sounds of nature… and motorcycles!

Yes, our tenants are retrieving their two-wheeled toys from their storage units and getting out there to enjoy the open road. I was reminded by one of our self storage customers that May is National Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.

Motorcycle Awareness Month is aimed at increasing awareness among drivers of all types of vehicles to drive responsibly and take heed of motorcycles sharing the roadway. Warmer weather brings out motorcycle lovers in droves! City streets, back roads, and highways are buzzing with motorcycling enthusiasts. This time of year demands more attention from motorcyclists and car drivers alike.

All Drivers Have Responsibility to Keep Motorcyclists Safe

Although motorcycles account for only 3% of all vehicles in the USA, they hold the same rights on the road as any other motorist. In many states, there are strong initiatives to educate motorcycle drivers and riders to take safety measures to avoid dangerous traffic situations and accidents.

Unfortunately, the same amount of emphasis regarding motorcycle safety is not taken with drivers of other vehicle types. It may seem unnecessary to do, but with motorcyclists being at a higher risk of injury and fatality in the event of a crash, it is an important matter to bring to the forefront.

A common prejudice among American drivers is the idea that motorcyclists ride at their own risk.  The risks associated with motorcycling, while true, do not remove the responsibility of passenger car drivers to practice safe driving habits like using turn signals and avoiding distracted driving.

Here are some great driving  awareness reminders:

  • Listen! Those loud pipes on motorcycles are not there just to be cool – they are also to alert other drivers that there is a motorcycle nearby.
  • Give full lane space to motorcycles, same as a full size car.
  • Check blind spots, look twice and signal when making turns, merging with traffic, and changing lanes.
  • When behind a motorcycle, leave extra space to allow for sudden breaking.
  • For the safety of everyone on the road, avoid distracted, drunk, and drowsy driving.

Motorcyclist – Take Charge of Your Safety on the Road

While most states require a test to receive a motorcycle license, a motorcycle safety course is also highly recommended. These courses can be taken through the state and are available at most motorcycle dealerships.

Are some tips for motorcyclists to help enjoy a safe ride:

  • Always wear a DOT-compliant helmet and use bright color and fluorescent gear to make yourself more visible – white helmets can lower risk by 24%.
  • Drive with your headlights turned on even during the day. Visibility to other drivers is key
  • Drive in the middle of the lane to become more visible to the traffic as opposed to straddling the lane divider lines.
  • Use caution while approaching an intersection, over-taking, or changing lanes.
  • Avoid lane splitting or driving aggressively, especially in heavier traffic.
  • Take a motorcycle safety and driving course to improve your riding skills
  • Use your hand and turn signal to inform others that you are taking a turn or changing lane.
  • For the safety of everyone on the road, avoid distracted, drunk, and drowsy driving.

Safety gear is an important part of rider’s safety.The leather worn by motorcyclist, while it may look cool, is really a second skin to protect the driver. Motorcyclists should enjoy the ride, but be prepared for the worst

 

  • Always wear a helmet – the leading cause death in motorcycle fatalities is head trauma 
  • Wear leather gloves – hands can sustain a lot of trauma during a motorcycle crash
  • Wear boots – Protect your feet and ankles from the road as well as hot engine parts
  • Leather jackets not only look cool, but are a rider’s “Second Skin” and can prevent a lot of damage in the case of an accident.
  • The type of pants worn are just as important as the jacket. Wear something that will protect your legs against “Road Rash “.

Motorcycle safety is the responsibility of everyone on the road; car and truck drivers, motorcyclists, and pedestrians. Awareness  from both the drivers and riders is required to make our roads safe for motorcycles, not only during Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, but all year round. The most common reason given by automobile drivers who are involved in an accident with the motorcycle is “ I didn’t see him”. Listen, and look twice – it could save someone’s life!

Whether you are on two wheels, or four, the staff here at The Storage Inn wishes you a great warm-weather season, and Happy Motoring!

April Showers and Other Weather Sayings

Storage Inn Blog post about Weather Sayings

April Showers and other Weather Sayings

Things are fairly quiet here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey. For the most part, our storage rental customers are observing the stay-at-home guidelines, however, we are happy to allow them access to retrieve essential items from their storage rental units.

As I sit here in the rental office watching the weather outside and wondering if it’s gonna rain, I hear the voice on the radio say “ Well you know – April showers bring May flowers!”.

While this seemed to make sense to me, it also made me wonder about some other weather-related sayings that might need a little explanation.

Long before meteorologists reported the weather, people made forecasts based on their observations of the sky, animals, and nature.

Many of the traditional sayings they used, called proverbs, are surprisingly accurate. Try out some old-fashioned forecasting—that still works today!  Here are some weather sayings and meanings courtesy of the Farmers Almanac.

“RED SKY AT NIGHT, SAILORS DELIGHT. RED SKY IN MORNING, SAILORS TAKE WARNING.”

A reddish sunset means that the air is dusty and dry. Since weather in North American latitudes usually moves from west to east, a red sky at sunset means dry weather is moving east and that’s good for sailing. Conversely, a reddish sunrise means that dry air from the west has already passed over us moving east and clearing the way for a storm to move in.

“THE HIGHER THE CLOUDS, THE FINER THE WEATHER.”

If you spot wispy, thin clouds way up high where the jet airplanes fly, expect a spell of pleasant weather. Keep an eye, however, on the smaller puff clouds (cumulus), especially if it’s in the morning or early afternoon. If the rounded tops of these clouds, which have flat bases, grow higher than the one cloud’s width, then there’s a chance of a thunderstorm forming.

“CLEAR MOON, FROST SOON.”

When the night sky is clear, Earth’s surface cools rapidly—there is no cloud cover to keep the heat in. If the night is clear enough to see the Moon and the temperature drops enough, frost will form. Expect a chilly morning!

“CLOUDS LIKE TOWERS MEAN FREQUENT SHOWERS.”

When you spy large, white clouds that look like cauliflower or castles in the sky, there is probably lots of dynamic weather going on inside. Innocent clouds look like billowy cotton, not towers. If the clouds start to swell and take on a gray tint, they’re probably turning into thunderstorms. Watch out!

“RAINBOW IN THE MORNING GIVES YOU FAIR WARNING.”

A rainbow in the morning indicates that a shower is in your near future.

“WHEN DEW IS ON THE GRASS, NO RAIN SHALL COME TO PASS.”

Morning dew is a sign that the previous night’s skies were clear, with no wind and decreasing temperatures. Clear, dry, windless conditions usually continue through the daytime.

“RING AROUND THE MOON? RAIN (OR SNOW) REAL SOON.”

A ring around the moon usually indicates an advancing warm front, which means precipitation. Under those conditions, high, thin clouds get lower and thicker as they pass over the moon. Ice crystals are reflected by the moon’s light, causing a halo to appear.

“RAIN FORETOLD, LONG LAST – SHORT NOTICE, SOON WILL PASS.”

If you find yourself toting an umbrella around for days “just in case,” rain will stick around for several hours when it finally comes. The gray overcast dominating the horizon means a large area is affected. Conversely, if you get caught in a surprise shower, it’s likely to be short-lived.

“A YEAR OF SNOW – CROPS WILL GROW.” 

A several-inch layer of snow contains more air than ice. Trapped between the interlocking snowflakes, the air serves to insulate the plants beneath it. When the snow melts, the water helps to keep the ground moist.

Observe the sky and see if these weather proverbs work for you. That’s it from the crew here at The Storage Inn – wishing you only the best weather and the best of times ahead!

Happy Saint Patrick's Day

A Short History of St. Patrick – The Storage Inn Blog

The Short History of Saint Patrick

It’s St. Patrick’s Day here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and the employees, and storage space renters alike are in a ”Luck o’ the Irish” mood! I’ve even had one couple stop into the front office dressed from head to toe in green. ”Happy St. Patty’s Day” they exclaimed – “Erin go bragh!”  I replied! That got me wondering about the origins of St. Patrick’s Day, so I decided to ask my “most Irish-looking” customers what they knew about Saint Patrick. It turns out that Sean, the husband, is not only Irish, but a history teacher too. “Well” he said, “for starters St. Patrick was neither Irish, nor a Saint. What???? – Did he at least invent green beer?!? No – he did not, but here is what he did do…

Patrick, whom almost everyone calls “Saint Patrick,” was never canonized by the Catholic Church, and was born to a wealthy family in 387 AD in Kilpatrick, Scotland. His real name was Maewyn Succat. It was his extensive missionary work in Ireland for which Patrick is famous. Patrick, at age sixteen, was captured by Irish raiders and spent several years as a slave in Ireland. It was during this time that he learned the various rituals, customs, and language of Druids, and it was these people that he eventually converted to Christianity. Patrick supposedly had a dream in which God spoke to him, saying, “Your ship is ready.” Patrick was then able to escape Ireland by ship. Shortly thereafter, he experienced another dream in which he received a letter that was labeled the “Voice of the Irish.” When he opened it, he heard the voices of all those whom he had met in Ireland begging him to return.

Patrick returned to Ireland to tell people about Christianity. Though the task was difficult and dangerous, he persisted and was able to build a strong foundation for conversion. The Irish people were receptive to his teachings, especially in light of the fact that he was able to take several of their Celtic symbols and “Christianize” them. The most well-known of Patrick’s illustrations is the shamrock, a certain type of clover sacred to the Druids, which he used as a symbol of the Trinity. During his thirty years of work there, he supposedly converted over 135,000 people, established 300 churches, and consecrated 350 bishops. Patrick died on March 17, 461. For over a millennium, the Irish have celebrated St. Patrick’s Day on March 17..

Each year millions of people celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. It’s a national holiday in Ireland where people do not work, but worship and gather with family. In the United States, the first St. Patrick’s Day parade was held in New York on March 17, 1762. It consisted largely of Irish soldiers. Today, St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated by wearing green, which symbolizes spring as well as Irish culture.

I thanked Sean and Erin for their brief, but insightful history lesson, and watched as they made their way back to their storage unit, presumably to retrieve some supplies for tonight’s St. Patrick’s Day festivities or maybe they were getting a jump on spring by pulling out St. Patrick’s favorite item to put into a storage unit… Paddy O’Furniture!! Is it time for that green beer yet? – Cheers!