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Remember to thank Veterans all year long

How Memorial Day Came To Be

Memorial Day weekend is finally upon us, and the yard is buzzing here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey. People are visiting their storage units, retrieving their barbecue grills and beach chairs in preparation for the big weekend. As I watch the busy storage yard activity, it occurs to me that many of our tenants and quite a few of our employees are veterans.

As a tribute, here are a few Memorial Day facts that you might not have known, courtesy of The Storage Inn.

The observance, which began in the years following the Civil War, was originally known as Decoration Day. By the late 1860s, many Americans had begun hosting tributes to the war’s fallen soldiers by decorating their graves with flowers and flags. It gradually came to be known as Memorial Day over the years.

It was Union General John A. Logan who called for an official nationwide day of remembrance on May 30, 1868, a date chosen because it was not the anniversary of any particular battle. However, the southern states originally observed a different day to honor the Confederate soldiers who died in the Civil War. Eventually the holiday evolved to commemorate fallen military personnel in all wars. There are still 11 states that observe an official day to honor those who lost their lives fighting for the Confederacy—Virginia is the only one that observes Confederate Memorial Day on the same day as Memorial Day.

In 1950, Congress passed a resolution requesting that the President issue a proclamation calling on Americans to observe Memorial Day as a day of prayer for permanent peace.

In 1968, Congress established Memorial Day as the last Monday in May, in order to create a three-day weekend for federal employees. But Memorial Day didn’t actually become an official federal holiday until 1971.

In 2000, President Bill Clinton signed the National Moment of Remembrance Act, which asks Americans to observe a Moment of Silence at 3:00 p.m. on Memorial Day..

Some of the largest Memorial Day parades take place in Chicago, New York, and, of course, Washington D.C. which boasts an audience exceeding 250,000, who watch as marching bands, active duty and retired military units, youth groups, veterans, and floats head down Constitution Avenue.

On Memorial Day, the United States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico direct the flag to be flown at half-staff until noon on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels.

U.S. citizens are asked to display the flag at half-staff from their homes before noon, as well.

So, while you’re having a great time with family and friends this weekend, do take a moment to remember those who gave their lives, to preserve our American way of life.  Have a great Memorial Day weekend, and God Bless America!

 

Celebrating Moms for over 100 years!!!

Celebrating Moms for over 100 years!!!

Today is Friday, two days before Mother’s Day, and the rental office here at The Storage Inn Self Storage in Egg Harbor Township, NJ is a buzz with people shuttling back and forth to and from their storage spaces, preparing for various spring activities and events.

Yesterday as one of our tenants, Mr. Hendry, was returning his van rental, I reminded him, “ Don’t forget about your wife this Sunday. It’s Mother’s Day!” “ Yeah”, he groaned, “ Another holiday made up by the greeting card companies.” As Mr. Henry shuffled out the door, and headed toward his storage unit, I realized that this was not the first time I had heard that comment made by someone. I wondered if it was true, so I checked into it, and here’s what I found.

I was surprised to find that Mother’s Day turns 103 this year! The holiday is known mostly as a time for brunches, gifts, cards, and general outpourings of love and appreciation, but the holiday has more somber roots: It was founded for mourning women to remember fallen soldiers and work for peace.

Mother’s Day and The Civil War

It all started in the 1850s, when West Virginia women’s organizer Ann Reeves Jarvis held Mother’s Day work clubs to improve sanitary conditions and try to lower infant mortality by fighting disease and curbing milk contamination during the Civil War. The group also tended to wounded soldiers from both sides of the conflict.

In the postwar years Jarvis and other women organized Mother’s Friendship Day picnics and other events as pacifist strategies to unite former foes. Julia Ward Howe – best known as the composer of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” – issued a widely read “Mother’s Day Proclamation” in 1870, calling for women to take an active political role in promoting peace.

The Modern Mother’s Day

After Ann’s death in 1905, her daughter, Anna took up the cause, and largely through her efforts, Mother’s Day came to be observed in a growing number of cities and states around the country, until President Woodrow Wilson officially set aside the second Sunday in May in 1914 for the holiday.

Today, of course, Mother’s Day is right up there with Valentine’s Day in terms of of consumerism. Americans will spend an average of $162 on mom this year, with total spending expected to reach $19.9 billion. The U.S. National Restaurant Association reports that Mother’s Day is the year’s most popular holiday for dining out, and the third most popular greeting card holiday behind Christmas and Valentine’s Day! About 133 million Mother’s Day cards are exchanged annually, according to Hallmark. After Christmas, it’s the second most popular holiday for giving gifts.

So, on Sunday, give Mom a nice card and some flowers, take her to a nice brunch, and then take her to see a Civil War reenactment – That is, after all, where this whole thing got started. Happy Mother’s Day!

 

Motorcycle Self Storage Tips for Spring!
Time to Ride!

April is on and there are plenty of motorcycles cruising past our office at The Storage Inn Self Storage facility here in Egg Harbor Township in South Jersey. I’ve also noticed a few of our storage space customers getting their bikes out and who could blame them on a days like these?

As I was making my rounds, I ran into one of our long time motorcycle storage customers, Chuck, who had his storage unit door open. He appeared to be staring intently at the inner workings of his Harley Road King.

“Headed out?” I yelled to him.

“ Not until I do my Spring safety check “  he shouted back at me.

Upon closer investigation, I found that Chuck had a paper checklist that he follows every spring. Being a rider myself, I was curious to see what his list included.

Here is Chuck’s checklist…

  1. Check your battery – This the heart of your ride’s electrical system. Chuck says that any biker worth his salt will have already been connected to a trickle charger, and should be good to go, but if you don’t have your battery on a charger, the first thing to make your motorcycle ride-ready is to charge your battery.
  2. Change the oil & filter – It’s best to change your bike’s oil before you store it for the winter, but if not, now’s the time to do it. Swap that stale lubricant out for fresh clean oil and a new filter. If you don’t do the work on your bike, make arrangements with your favorite cycle shop to get it done.
  3. Kick the Tires : We don’t really want you to kick them, but you should do a full 360 degree check on each tire for any cracking or punctures. Also, check for wear. On many tires, tread wear indicator bars signal a need for replacement. But there also the old trick of using a penny. If you can see the top of Lincoln’s head  when facing down and inserted into the tire tread… it’s time for a new tire. If your tires pass the wear test, inflate them to the manufacturer’s inflation specs and your rubber is ready to go!
  4. Fuel up  – Ideally, you should have stabilized the fuel in your motorcycle during the winterizing process before you placed it into storage. If you didn’t winterize, and also didn’t fill the tank before storing, check the fuel tank for rust, which may have formed due to water condensation. If the tank is clean, fill it and ‘ride-on’. If there are signs of rust, you’ll live with the consequences – fouled carburetor, clogged fuel filter, etc. – until you replace the tank.
  5. Check your Connections – A Spring tune up of cables, plugs, and pivot points is time well spent. Check all electrical connections, cables, and all moving parts that might require lubrication. Things tend to dry out over the winter, so take the time to make sure that the moving parts are kept moving!

    Mature man,working on motorcycle in garage

  6. Lights! Camera! Action! Turn on your motorcycle’s power and check all the lights for any that have inoperative bulbs and replace them. (i.e.  brake lights, turn signals, headlights, etc.) Often, replacement bulbs come in twos, so save extras for the next time you need one. If a new bulb does not light, it’s time to check the fuse box. If that doesn’t work, it’s time to visit your local cycle shop. Electrical problems are best left to the experts.
  7. Ready, Set, Stop! Stopping your motorcycle safely is just as important as ensuring your bike can accelerate. Before you hit the road, thoroughly check all the components of your brake system – lever adjustment, cables, calipers, brake pads, etc. If things don’t seem right and you’re not comfortable making adjustments, seek professional help. It’s always better to be safe than sorry.
  8. Stay Hydrated – Check all of the motorcycle’s fluid levels – brake, clutch, oil, coolant. Top them off as needed. Look for any leaks on the floor where your motorcycle’s been stored. Another way to check for leaks is to start and warm your bike to running temperature, then turn it off and check for leaks.
  9. Keep it Clean – The old adage, “Cleanliness is next to Godliness” is true – especially for your motorcycle. When you’ve taken all the steps to prepare your motorcycle mechanically, thoroughly clean the exterior. Your bike will look as good as it runs and you’ll look good riding it!!!
  10. Ride safe! Always watch out for other drivers! 

So there you have it. Chuck’s checklist. Get ready, get that bike out of storage, and get riding!

 

April Showers and Springtime Flowers

It’s April here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, and things have been busy & sunny and busy & wet! It depends on the day!

A couple days ago during a torrential downpour I was speaking with one of our storage space customers. He was wearing his rain gear while organizing his storage unit. “I feel like I’m living in Seattle!”, he exclaimed. “Or London!” I shouted back.

As I walked back to the self storage rental office, I was thinking about rainy places. I wondered where the rainiest places in the world exist, so I google it. Here is what I found…

Although it might feel like you’re gonna float away on a river of rain sometimes, the average rainfall in the United States is about 32 inches a year and that’s nothing compared to the top 10 rainiest places on earth.

Imagine weathering these spots…

10. Emei Shan, Sichuan Province, China
Average annual rainfall: 322 inches

Mount Emei is the highest of the Four Sacred Mountains of Buddhism and receives the most rainfall in China. There is a phenomenon called a “clouds sea” in the area and during the monsoon, it attracts a double layer of clouds that result in it receiving huge rainfalls.

9. Kukui, Maui, Hawaii
Average annual rainfall: 366 inches

The mountain peak of Puu Kukui is the 9th wettest place on earth.

8. Mt. Waialeale, Kauai, Hawaii
Average annual rainfall: 384 inches

The name Mt. Waialeale means “overflowing water”. The rain around this extinct volcano is so wet and slippery that access is extremely difficult. Researchers believe that the peak’s conical shape makes it so rainy.
In 1912, Mt. Waialeale saw a record 683 inches of rain.

7. Big Bog, Maui, Hawaii
Average annual rainfall: 405 inches

Despite being subjected to constant rain, Big Bog is a major tourist attraction on Maui because of its lush scenery.

The amazing precipitation is caused by easterly trade winds that bring moisture from the Pacific up against the steep mountainside.

6. Debundscha, Cameroon, Africa
Average annual rainfall: 405 inches

The village of Debundscha lies at the foot of Mount Cameroon, the highest peak in Africa. It’s believed the location contributes to its massive rains as the mountain blocks the clouds.

5. San Antonio de Ureca, Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea
Average annual rainfall: 411 inches

San Antonio de Ureca is the wettest place in the African Continent. The dry season is only from November to March, with the rest of the months attracting heavy rain. During the brief dry season, tourists can watch turtles come ashore on the beaches to lay their eggs.

4. Cropp River, New Zealand
Average annual rainfall: 453 inches

The river may only be only 9km long, but it certainly punches above its weight in precipitation.

3. Tutendo, Colombia, South America
Average annual rainfall: 463 inches

There are two rainy seasons in this region so it’s pretty much teeming all year round.

2. Cherrapunji, Meghalaya State, India
Average annual rainfall: 464 inches

Ironically, despite being the second wettest place on Earth, residents of this village face water shortages in winter when no rain falls at all for months at a time. During the wet season, incessant rains lash the region, sometimes for 15-21 days at a stretch. The area is also famous for its waterfalls, hills and living root bridges.

1. Mawsynram, Meghalaya State, India
Average annual rainfall: 467 inches

Located only 15km from Cherrapunji, there’s often dispute between the villages about which should hold the title of world’s wettest.
Villagers in Mawsynram use grass to soundproof their huts from deafening rain that pelts their homes during the rainy season.
Meteorologists say Mawsynram’s location, close to Bangladesh and the Bay of Bengal is the reason it receives so much rain.

That concludes our list of the top 10 wettest places on Earth, so, as you can see, we really don’t have it all that bad here in the good ole U.S. of A. “Happy Spring Showers and Flowers” from the staff here at The Storage Inn, and if your heading to India, be sure to pack your swimmies!

The Storage Inn investigates South Jersey’s Underground Railroad

South Jersey’s Underground Railroad

Its mid February at The Storage Inn Self Storage here in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and we’ve already been through Groundhog Day, Mardi Gras, and Valentine’s Day. February, however, is also a month-long celebration of our nation’s Black History. The Storage Inn is located just outside Atlantic City, New Jersey, a city rich in Black History – Club Harlem, Chicken Bone Beach, and the Boardwalk Empire Prohibition Era come to mind immediately, but what many people don’t know, is that Atlantic and Cape May counties in southern New Jersey were integral in the success of the Underground Railroad in the mid 1800’s.

This was brought to light by one of our storage customers who happens to be the curator for the Black History section of the Atlantic City Heritage Collections at the resort’s public library. Below are the highlights of our conversation regarding the underground railroad in our area.

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses used in the 19th century by slaves to escape to free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause.



These safe houses were located in small communities, so those seeking freedom could go from town to town without anyone noticing them, For slaves using the Underground Railroad to escape the south, reaching Atlantic and Cape May counties offered hope that the journey to freedom might soon be over.

Communities such as Somers Point and Egg Harbor City in Atlantic County offered those escaping slavery a direct path to Pennsylvania, a state that had already outlawed slavery.

“The goal of slaves on the Underground Railroad was to make it to Pennsylvania, so when they got to Egg Harbor City, NJ they knew that freedom was just days away. I’m sure that many people don’t realize how much of an impact South Jersey had on the Underground Railroad,” said Ava, our curator.

Cape May also played a prominent role in the Underground Railroad. Cape May sits directly across the Bay from Delaware and Maryland. During that time, land crossings were actually more difficult than water crossings, so places that had water access became more popular.



Cape May was known to those seeking freedom, as a place with safe locations that they could count on.


Finding reliable numbers for escaped slaves who traveled through New Jersey, let alone Atlantic County, has proven tricky. The national estimate for those who used the Underground Railroad as a path to freedom is between 30,000 and 40,000 escapees.

You know, they say that you learn something new everyday, and today I learned something that makes me just a bit more proud of the South Jersey area!  Until the next time!

 

Nice Weather…If You’re a Penguin!

It’s early February here at The Storage Inn self storage in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and the frigid temperatures are here! Earlier today, I bundled up and ventured out of the rental office to do a yard check.  As I made my rounds, I noticed one of our longtime storage tenants, Mr. Bradley, removing a few items from his self storage unit. “Nice weather!” I yelled. “Yeah, If you’re a penguin!” Mr. Bradley shot back. ”I feel like we’re living at the North Pole”  I said as I shivered past him. Then he said something that I found curious …”Well you won’t find any penguins at the North Pole”. 

I was too cold to continue the conversation, so I went back to the office to ponder Mr. Bradley’s comment. Was he correct about the penguins not living in the North Pole? I did a little research. It turns out that Mr. Bradley was correct – penguins only live in the southern hemisphere, mainly in Antarctica. Surprisingly, I also came across some other interesting differences between the North and South Poles. Here is what I found… 

North Pole vs South Pole

The biggest difference is that the Arctic is a sea surrounded by land while the Antarctic is land surrounded by a sea. This fundamental difference is the reason for many of the other differences between the two regions.

The North Pole

The North Pole is basically in the Arctic Ocean.

The ice there is 1m to 3m (3-10ft) thick floating on the Arctic Ocean. It’s made of frozen sea water with snow on top. Sea level is usually no more than 1 meter below your feet and the sea bed another 4,260 meters below that. The ice may be flat and smooth or rough, having been broken up and refrozen together again. The ice is moving at anywhere from a snail’s pace to walking pace.

The North Pole is 450 miles from the nearest land at the northern tip of Greenland.

Temperatures are estimated from those measured elsewhere in the Arctic, as there are no structures or settlements out on the ocean, the ice is too unreliable and unstable.

At the North Pole the sun is continually above the horizon from the March equinox to the September equinox reaching a high point of 23.5° at the summer solstice around June the 21st. From September to March it is continually below the horizon.

The poles have 5 months of daylight, then a month of twilight, then 5 months of darkness, then a month of twilight before starting all over again.

The Arctic has many large land animals including reindeer, musk ox, lemmings, arctic hares, arctic terns, snowy owls, squirrels, arctic fox and polar bears. As the Arctic is a part of the land masses of Europe, North America and Asia, these animals can migrate south in the winter and head back to the north again in the more productive summer months. 

There are also many kinds of large marine animals such as walrus and a variety of seals. Narwhals and other whales are present but not as plentiful as they were in pre-whaling days.

 

The South Pole

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The South Pole is a point on the great ice sheet of Eastern Antarctica.

The South Pole is at an altitude of about 9,300 ft on ice that is 9,000 ft thick! It reaches down to rock which rises to just over 350 ft above sea level. This rock is pushed into the earth’s mantle by the weight of the ice. Altitude sickness is a risk at the South Pole for people arriving by plane. Accumulated snowfall that has built up over time and it never melts accounts for the creation of ice.

The ice is moving towards the Weddell Sea in the west at about 33ft per year.

The nearest sea, called the Bay of Whales, is about 800 miles away.

Temperatures have been measured at the South Pole since 1956 as there is a large research station there.

There is a ceremonial pole that is repositioned every year on the first of January.

 

The South Pole also has 5 months of daylight, then a month of twilight, then 5 months of darkness, then a month of twilight before starting all over again, but its seasons are opposite the North Pole.

The largest land animal in the Antarctic is an insect, a wingless midge, less than 0.5in long. There are no flying insects (they’d get blown away).

There are however a great many sea creatures that live in the Antarctic region. These include huge numbers of penguin varieties such as the Adelie, Chinstrap, Gentoo, King, Emperor, Rockhopper and Macaroni. Seal specifies include Fur, Leopard, Weddell, Elephant and Crabeaters.(Crabeater seals are the second most populous large mammal on the planet after man). There are also many kinds of birds such as albatrosses and assorted petrels. There are places in Antarctica where the wildlife reaches incredible densities mainly because there is no indigenous human population on Antarctica to hunt them!

Well, now we all know more about the North and South poles than ever before! Luckily The Storage Inn rental office is nice and warm, but if this weather keeps up, I think we may have to adopt a penguin as our mascot! Enjoy the rest of the winter everyone!

 

Brrrrrrrrr!

The New Year is here, and we here at The Storage Inn Self Storage in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, are experiencing some of the coldest weather in recent memory. Luckily for our storage space customers, we’ve unboxed the long johns and stocked up on lock de-icer to help them through this cold snap! I asked one of our rental customers, who also happens to be a police officer, what he found to be the biggest problem during cold weather like this. Without hesitating, he said “fires caused by people trying to keep warm using space heaters, or other inventive methods. We all want to be warm, but we have to be safe too.”

On that note, here are some tips from our local Police and Fire departments on staying safe and warm during extreme cold!

Layers, Layers, Layers!

It might seem obvious, but piling on a few extra layers is a great way to stay warm, especially if you have to be outside. Keeping your core warm is especially important when temperatures dip below freezing. Air gets trapped between the layers of clothing, and is heated by your body, allowing you to stay warmer than with one heavy garment..

Eat to Keep the Heat

You already know that eating healthy in the winter can help to fend off colds and the flu, but did you know it might help keep you warm, too? Eating extra healthy fats during the winter can help rev up metabolism, which in turn heats the body.

If your New Year’s resolution was to drop a few pounds, don’t worry – you can always skip the extra fat and try eating warmer foods and drinks including soups, spicy foods, hot coffee and teas to fend off the chill!

It May Seem like a Good Idea, but…..

Although alcoholic beverages might make you feel warm, they actually decrease your core temperature and can be dangerous during winter months.

Alcohol actually reverses some reflexes that control body temperature, especially the body’s ability to shiver. Alcohol can also make you sweat, even when it is cold, which can lower core temperatures even more. Save the cocktail until you’re in for the night!

Keep your Fingers and Toes Toasty

Hypothermia is most likely to begin in extremities like your hands and feet, so keeping your fingers and toes warm is important. Whether you’re walking to work or just around the block, make sure to wear sturdy, insulated shoes that will help prevent slips on slick surfaces and keep your feet dry. Also wear insulated gloves or mittens.

Give your Space Heater some Space!

Space heaters are a great way to add extra heat to colder rooms, but always remember to keep flammable items including clothing, rugs, bedding and curtains at least three feet away from the heater at all times. Also remember to place the heater on a hard, non-flammable, stable surface and to turn it off completely before leaving the house. Set a reminder on your phone if you’re afraid you’ll forget.

Don’t Forget our Furry Friends

Always remember to bring pets inside when temperatures begin to drop. You might be jealous of your dog or cat’s fur coat when temperatures drop, but they need to be kept warm too. Limit the length of their walks, particularly on snowy or icy surfaces.

Keep an Eye on the Fire

It’s easy to snooze in front of a roaring fire, but always make sure that fireplace embers are completely out before going to bed for the night.
Wood fireplaces should always have a glass or metal fire screen large enough to catch sparks and rolling logs.

Keep Important Phone Numbers Handy

Heavy snow and ice can settle on power lines and cause power outages. Write down utility numbers and have them handy during a storm in case you need to report an outage or incident.

Check in on Elderly Friends and Neighbors

Here are a few things you can check:
Do they have heat in the home?
Do they have hot water?
Are all their appliances working properly?
Are their pipes, sprinkler system and faucets protected against freezing?
Is their phone operational?
Do they have the phone number of someone they can call for minor emergencies? Yours?
Please don’t wait until something tragic happens. Take a few minutes to help a neighbor. It’s well worth your time.

So, there you are – some great tips to help you deal with the cold weather. From the staff here at The Storage Inn, have a Warm, Safe and Happy New Year! 

 

Mr. Nick in his moving truck

Mr. Nick is one busy storage unit renter

So, it’s the day before Christmas here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey – Almost time for my annual visit from one of our biggest customers, Mr. Nick. Mr. Nick’s been a storage unit tenant with us for as long as anyone can remember. He’s an unusual guy – older – the outdoorsy type – from up North somewhere. You know, big bushy beard, wears a lot of red flannel shirts with suspenders. That sort of thing.

Mr. Nick has seven of our extra large storage spaces with the extra high ceilings. He stops in every year around this time to let us know that even though he’ll be emptying out the storage units, he’s not moving out.

 

feature_christmas-elf-featMr. Nick is certainly a bit on the eccentric side and I’m assuming pretty wealthy since he’s mentioned renting storage units like ours all over the world. Each year right around Christmas time, his crew pulls in with a couple of giant, red S.C. Moving and Storage vans, and empties out out all seven of his storage spaces. The funny thing is, beginning in January, I’ll see his helpers back again and on a monthly basis, refilling the storage units with electronics, toys, sporting goods, and all sorts of goodies.

This year I decided to have a little chat with his crew. Nice guys – unusually short, but very well mannered and hard workers too. They all refer to Mr. Nick as “The big guy” which is quite true in height and around the waist line.

While his helpers were in the yard the other day,  I decided to be a little nosey.

“Excuse me guys. Just curious. What type of business is Mr. Nick in if you don’t mind me asking?” I questioned.

“Import/export” replied one of his of helpers.

“Oh, so he buys and then resells things” I asked.

“No, no – He gives it all away!” answered a particularly short man, who appeared to be the leader of the crew.

“Wow, really? That’s great – a wealthy philanthropist!” I gushed.

“I guess you could say that, but the big guy really doesn’t care about money – He just likes to make people happy!” came a high pitched voice from behind a pile of toys.

If that don’t beat all I thought to myself. I tipped my Storage Inn hat and wished Mr. Nick’s crew a good day and Happy Holidays. I walked back to the rental office thinking about my conversation with Mr. Nick’s helpers. Hmmmm, I thought – Puzzling. A guy from up North, with a bushy white beard, dressed in all red, with an import/ export charitable organization?… who collects toys and other goodies throughout the year, only to give them away at Christmas time? If I didn’t know any better I would guess he’s… omg…. I think I know what the “S. C.” in  S. C. Moving and Storage stands for!  Happy Holidays from The Storage Inn!

Cool Facts about Thanksgiving

It’s a beautiful fall day here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, and Thanksgiving is this week! Ahhh, Thanksgiving – a day for family visits, football, and overeating! I conducted a random poll of our self storage customers regarding Thanksgiving and found that while everyone seems to like the food, mostly the men like football, and everyone seems to have mixed emotions about the family visits. As one of our long time storage unit renters, Jim put it, “I love to see my relatives for Thanksgiving, then I love to see them leave!” 

As a service to our readers, the staff here at The Storage Inn has rounded up a few very cool facts about Thanksgiving, some of which might come in handy during those awkward silences at the family dinner table. 

Thomas Jefferson Nixes Thanksgiving!

George Washington was the first to declare Thanksgiving a holiday, but it was on a year-to-year basis, so presidents had to re-declare it every year. Jefferson refused to declare it a holiday during his presidency because he fervently believed in the separation of church and state and thought that the day of “prayer” violated the First Amendment. 

It wasn’t until 1863, when Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving a federal holiday, that it was officially scheduled to fall on the fourth Thursday of every November. 

It’s a zoo out there!

The first Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York took place in 1914, when Macy’s employees dressed in vibrant costumes and marched to the flagship store on 34th Street. The parade used floats instead of balloons, and it featured monkeys, bears, camels, and elephants, all borrowed from the Central Park Zoo.

The parade was also originally called the Macy’s Christmas Parade but was renamed the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in 1927. Macy’s originally hoped their “Christmas parade” would get their shoppers ready for big holiday shopping sprees. 

Turkeytown U.S.A.

Three small towns in America are named after the nation’s favorite bird. The towns are Turkey, Texas; Turkey, North Carolina; and Turkey Creek, Louisiana. There are also two townships in Pennsylvania called Upper Turkeyfoot and Lower Turkeyfoot.

“Jingle Bells” was originally a Thanksgiving song

James Pierpoint composed the song in 1857 for children celebrating Thanksgiving. The title was “One Horse Open Sleigh,” and it was such a hit that it was sung again at Christmas.

The song quickly became associated with the Christmas holiday season, and the title was officially changed in 1859, two years later.

Ben Franklin – Turkey Lover

Benjamin Franklin thought Eagles were “a bird of bad moral character.”
Franklin thought the Turkey was a “much more respectable bird.”

The Detroit Lions always play on Thanksgiving

The first NFL football game that took place on Thanksgiving Day was in 1934, when the Detroit Lions played the Chicago Bears. The Lions have played on Thanksgiving ever since, except when the team was called away to serve during World War II. The Dallas Cowboys also always play on Thanksgiving. Their first Thanksgiving Day game was held in 1966, and the Cowboys have only missed two games since then. 

The night before Thanksgiving is Party Time!

The Wednesday before Thanksgiving is the best day for bar sales in America. It makes sense, since nearly all Americans have Thanksgiving off, and dealing with family members can be very stressful. (But at least stuffing your face with fatty Thanksgiving foods is a perfect hangover cure.)

Thanksgiving by “Hungry Man”

In 1953 Swanson Foods overestimated the demand for turkey by over 260 tons. The owners of the company had no idea what to do with all the leftovers, so they ordered 5,000 aluminum trays and loaded them with the turkey leftovers to create the first TV dinner. 

“Franksgiving” Flops

In 1939, Franklin Roosevelt changed the date of Thanksgiving from the last Thursday in November to the second-to-last in an attempt to lift the economy during the Great Depression, by giving people more time to shop for Christmas. It caused such a public outcry that people began referring to it as “Franksgiving.” After two years, Congress ditched the new policy and set the fourth Thursday of November as the legal holiday. 

Minnesota – The Turkey State!

Minnesota produces more turkeys than any other state in America. The state produced about 44.5 million birds last year, North Carolina, Arkansas, Indiana, and Missouri are also top producers.

A Turkey Saved….

The White House has a tradition of pardoning one lucky turkey each year. The annual tradition began in 1947 with President Harry Truman although some think that it actually started in the 1860’s with Abraham Lincoln, after his son Tad begged him to spare his pet turkey’s life.

Despite these two theories of the origins of the pardon, George H. W. Bush was the first president to officially grant a turkey a presidential pardon, according to The New York Times. 

Okay – now that you have some cool Thanksgiving facts, courtesy of The Storage Inn, you are ready to face your relatives on Thanksgiving! Feel free to pepper these unique facts throughout the dinner conversation, and give yourself a presidential pardon allowing you to have a second slice of pumpkin pie – Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

 

My Veteran’s Day Visitor

It’s been a cold and blustery start to November in South Jersey, but things at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, are as busy as ever. Yesterday our rental office was buzzing with new customers securing storage units or buying packing supplies, as well as current self storage customers just stopping in to check grab items from their units.

In the middle of all the hustle and bustle in strolled a young man in uniform. I recognized him instantly! It was my nephew, Ryan, on his way home and on leave from the Army, just in time for Veterans Day weekend.

I came around the counter and gave him a big handshake and hug! “You here to store the Army’s arsenal of equipment at The Storage Inn?” I asked laughing.

He just grinned and said,”You would need a lot more space than you’ve got here!”. We had a nice conversation after which we both laughed and promised to visit again before he returned to base.

That got me thinking, I wonder just how much equipment the US military would actually have to store? I did some research…

Manpower

The U.S. Military has over 2,000,000 personnel including active and reserve! (We won’t be storing personnel)



Airpower

Total Aircraft Strength – 13,362. Including over 4,000 fighter and attack aircraft and nearly 6,000 helicopters!

Land

5,884 Combat tanks
38,882 Armored fighting vehicles
950 self-propelled artillery vehicles
795 pieces of Towed Artillery
1,197 Rocket Projectors

Naval

20 Aircraft Carriers
65 Destroyers
10 Frigates
66 Submarines
13 Patrol vessels
11 Minesweepers

So there you have it, the latest published inventory of our United States armed forces equipment.

I saw my nephew Ryan at a family gathering last night and showed him my research, very proud of my facts and figures. He stared at it for a moment, looked up at me and grinned and said “Uncle Jerry, this is just the stuff that you’re allowed to know about”. We laughed as I thanked him for his service, and gave him a big hug before heading home.

Well, my research has certainly taught me one thing… Even though The Storage Inn is the largest self storage facility in the EHT area, we would need a pretty significant major expansion to store all of the military’s items. Happy Veterans Day!