Cool Facts about Thanksgiving

It’s a beautiful fall day here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, and Thanksgiving is this week! Ahhh, Thanksgiving – a day for family visits, football, and overeating! I conducted a random poll of our self storage customers regarding Thanksgiving and found that while everyone seems to like the food, mostly the men like football, and everyone seems to have mixed emotions about the family visits. As one of our long time storage unit renters, Jim put it, “I love to see my relatives for Thanksgiving, then I love to see them leave!” 

As a service to our readers, the staff here at The Storage Inn has rounded up a few very cool facts about Thanksgiving, some of which might come in handy during those awkward silences at the family dinner table. 

Thomas Jefferson Nixes Thanksgiving!

George Washington was the first to declare Thanksgiving a holiday, but it was on a year-to-year basis, so presidents had to re-declare it every year. Jefferson refused to declare it a holiday during his presidency because he fervently believed in the separation of church and state and thought that the day of “prayer” violated the First Amendment. 

It wasn’t until 1863, when Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving a federal holiday, that it was officially scheduled to fall on the fourth Thursday of every November. 

It’s a zoo out there!

The first Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York took place in 1914, when Macy’s employees dressed in vibrant costumes and marched to the flagship store on 34th Street. The parade used floats instead of balloons, and it featured monkeys, bears, camels, and elephants, all borrowed from the Central Park Zoo.

The parade was also originally called the Macy’s Christmas Parade but was renamed the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in 1927. Macy’s originally hoped their “Christmas parade” would get their shoppers ready for big holiday shopping sprees. 

Turkeytown U.S.A.

Three small towns in America are named after the nation’s favorite bird. The towns are Turkey, Texas; Turkey, North Carolina; and Turkey Creek, Louisiana. There are also two townships in Pennsylvania called Upper Turkeyfoot and Lower Turkeyfoot.

“Jingle Bells” was originally a Thanksgiving song

James Pierpoint composed the song in 1857 for children celebrating Thanksgiving. The title was “One Horse Open Sleigh,” and it was such a hit that it was sung again at Christmas.

The song quickly became associated with the Christmas holiday season, and the title was officially changed in 1859, two years later.

Ben Franklin – Turkey Lover

Benjamin Franklin thought Eagles were “a bird of bad moral character.”
Franklin thought the Turkey was a “much more respectable bird.”

The Detroit Lions always play on Thanksgiving

The first NFL football game that took place on Thanksgiving Day was in 1934, when the Detroit Lions played the Chicago Bears. The Lions have played on Thanksgiving ever since, except when the team was called away to serve during World War II. The Dallas Cowboys also always play on Thanksgiving. Their first Thanksgiving Day game was held in 1966, and the Cowboys have only missed two games since then. 

The night before Thanksgiving is Party Time!

The Wednesday before Thanksgiving is the best day for bar sales in America. It makes sense, since nearly all Americans have Thanksgiving off, and dealing with family members can be very stressful. (But at least stuffing your face with fatty Thanksgiving foods is a perfect hangover cure.)

Thanksgiving by “Hungry Man”

In 1953 Swanson Foods overestimated the demand for turkey by over 260 tons. The owners of the company had no idea what to do with all the leftovers, so they ordered 5,000 aluminum trays and loaded them with the turkey leftovers to create the first TV dinner. 

“Franksgiving” Flops

In 1939, Franklin Roosevelt changed the date of Thanksgiving from the last Thursday in November to the second-to-last in an attempt to lift the economy during the Great Depression, by giving people more time to shop for Christmas. It caused such a public outcry that people began referring to it as “Franksgiving.” After two years, Congress ditched the new policy and set the fourth Thursday of November as the legal holiday. 

Minnesota – The Turkey State!

Minnesota produces more turkeys than any other state in America. The state produced about 44.5 million birds last year, North Carolina, Arkansas, Indiana, and Missouri are also top producers.

A Turkey Saved….

The White House has a tradition of pardoning one lucky turkey each year. The annual tradition began in 1947 with President Harry Truman although some think that it actually started in the 1860’s with Abraham Lincoln, after his son Tad begged him to spare his pet turkey’s life.

Despite these two theories of the origins of the pardon, George H. W. Bush was the first president to officially grant a turkey a presidential pardon, according to The New York Times. 

Okay – now that you have some cool Thanksgiving facts, courtesy of The Storage Inn, you are ready to face your relatives on Thanksgiving! Feel free to pepper these unique facts throughout the dinner conversation, and give yourself a presidential pardon allowing you to have a second slice of pumpkin pie – Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

 

My Veteran’s Day Visitor

It’s been a cold and blustery start to November in South Jersey, but things at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, are as busy as ever. Yesterday our rental office was buzzing with new customers securing storage units or buying packing supplies, as well as current self storage customers just stopping in to check grab items from their units.

In the middle of all the hustle and bustle in strolled a young man in uniform. I recognized him instantly! It was my nephew, Ryan, on his way home and on leave from the Army, just in time for Veterans Day weekend.

I came around the counter and gave him a big handshake and hug! “You here to store the Army’s arsenal of equipment at The Storage Inn?” I asked laughing.

He just grinned and said,”You would need a lot more space than you’ve got here!”. We had a nice conversation after which we both laughed and promised to visit again before he returned to base.

That got me thinking, I wonder just how much equipment the US military would actually have to store? I did some research…

Manpower

The U.S. Military has over 2,000,000 personnel including active and reserve! (We won’t be storing personnel)



Airpower

Total Aircraft Strength – 13,362. Including over 4,000 fighter and attack aircraft and nearly 6,000 helicopters!

Land

5,884 Combat tanks
38,882 Armored fighting vehicles
950 self-propelled artillery vehicles
795 pieces of Towed Artillery
1,197 Rocket Projectors

Naval

20 Aircraft Carriers
65 Destroyers
10 Frigates
66 Submarines
13 Patrol vessels
11 Minesweepers

So there you have it, the latest published inventory of our United States armed forces equipment.

I saw my nephew Ryan at a family gathering last night and showed him my research, very proud of my facts and figures. He stared at it for a moment, looked up at me and grinned and said “Uncle Jerry, this is just the stuff that you’re allowed to know about”. We laughed as I thanked him for his service, and gave him a big hug before heading home.

Well, my research has certainly taught me one thing… Even though The Storage Inn is the largest self storage facility in the EHT area, we would need a pretty significant major expansion to store all of the military’s items. Happy Veterans Day!

 

Holiday Storage: It’s time to get out the Halloween decorations!

Ah, Fall! Leaves are turning brilliant colors, and there is a nip in the air! As the manager of The Storage Inn self storage in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, I also notice something else this time of year – customers pulling their holiday decorations out of their self storage units. Today I noticed Mrs. Wilcott taking Halloween decorations out of her storage space, including a large ceramic Jack O’Lantern. This got me to thinking – “what are jack-o-lanterns, and where did they come from?” – So I did a bit of research, and here is what I found…

So where did Jack-o-lanterns Come From?

Jack-o’-lanterns have been around for centuries, and it all began with an Irish myth. According to Legend, a man nicknamed Stingy Jack invited the devil to have a drink with him. True to his name, Jack did not want to pay, and persuaded the devil to turn himself into a coin to pay for the drinks. Once the devil had made the transformation, Jack decided that he wanted to keep the coin, and placed it into his pocket next to a cross, which prevented the devil from changing back into his original form. Eventually Jack realized that although he had the coin, he could not spend it without allowing the Devil to change back to his original form, and exact his revenge – so he made a deal. Jack would allow the devil to reclaim his original form so long as the devil  would never claim his soul.

According to the legend, when Jack finally died, God would not allow him into heaven based on his less-than-stellar behavior on Earth. The Devil, still upset by the trick that Jack had played on him, and in keeping to his promise not to claim Jack’s soul, would not allow Jack into hell. Instead he sent Jack off into the dark night with only a burning coal to light his way. Legend has it that Jack placed the coal into a carved-out turnip, and has been roaming the Earth, trying to find his way home ever since.

378-stingy-jack-294x300

The Irish originally referred to this ghostly figure as “Jack of the lantern”, but eventually shortened it to “Jack-o’-Lantern”. The original Jack o lanterns made in Ireland and Scotland, were made by carving scary faces into turnips or potatoes, and placing them in windows or near doors to frighten away Stingy Jack, and any other evil spirits that might be lurking. When immigrants from these countries finally arrived in America, they found that pumpkins, which were native to America, were perfect for making Jack-o-lanterns –  and so the tradition of the American pumpkin Jack O’Lantern was born!

Storage prices that even Stingy Jack would love?

If you’re a holiday enthusaist who needs a storage solution to keep all your holiday decorations stored safe and sound, then stop by one our Storage Inn locations in either Egg Harbor Township New Jersey or Ocean City New Jersey. Our friendly staff will be happy to scare up some storage space for you at a cheap storage unit price that even ole Stingy Jack might like!

 

 

What is Indian Summer?

It’s the first half of October here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, and the place is jumping! This probably has something to do with the unusually warm weather we’ve been experiencing?!

One of our customers, Damon, strode into our storage supplies store and proclaimed, “October, and it’s actually hot outside!”  to which I replied, ” Indian Summer!”

Damon, who also happens to be a school teacher, told me that I was, in fact, incorrect, and that Indian Summer only occurs after the first frost of the year. “Still hot though!” he exclaimed as he walked out of the office and back towards his storage space.

Hmmmm – I wondered if he was actually correct about the frost thing, so I checked it out, and found some interesting facts about “Indian Summer”.

Indian summer is defined as a period of unseasonably warm, dry and calm weather, usually following a period of colder weather or frost in late Autumn.

The Origin

Indian summer was first recorded in Letters From an American Farmer, in a 1778 work by the French-American soldier turned farmer, J. H. St. John de Crèvecoeur.

“Then a severe frost succeeds which prepares it to receive the voluminous coat of snow which is soon to follow; though it is often preceded by a short interval of smoke and mildness, called the Indian Summer.”

There are many references to the term in American literature to refer to any late flowering following a period of decline. John Greenleaf Whittier wrote of “The Indian Summer of the Heart”, and Oliver Wendell Holmes mentions “an Indian summer of serene widowhood” in his story The Guardian Angel.


Why “Indian”?

The English already had names for this phenomenon including St. Luke’s Summer, St. Martin’s Summer or All-Hallows Summer, but eventually these terms disappeared and were replaced by indian summer.

Why Indian? Well, no one knows but, as is commonplace when no one knows, many people have guessed. Here are three of the more commonly repeated guesses…

When European settlers first came across the phenomenon in America it became known as the Indian’s Summer as Native American tribes would wait for a warm spell in the autumn to harvest their crops including pumpkins, gourds, and fall vegetables.

It originated from raids on European settlements by Indian war parties, which usually ended in late autumn, after “Indian Summer”.


Native Americans were considered untrustworthy by many white settlers, spawning terms such as “Indian giver”. The aforementioned late-summer heat was considered a “false summer”, thus the term “Indian” summer.

Well, who knows if any of these theories are correct? What I do know is that both the staff, and our self-storage customers here at The Storage Inn will be enjoying the warm days ahead! I think I’ll spend a couple next week in shorts and flip-flops, turn the ball game on the radio, sit on my back deck and have a cold beer – Indian Summer Rules!

It’s National Chicken Month!

Throughout September here at The Storage Inn Self Storage in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey our storage customers have been stowing their summer items, and removing some of their cool weather gear from their storage rental units.

Yesterday,  as I was checking-in one of our moving trucks for rent when I noticed one of our awesome customers, Amy, at the security gate. Amy and her husband own one of the local Chick-fil-A franchises – very nice people.

”How’s the chicken business?” I yelled.

“ Very busy,” she yelled back.

“We have a lot of specials going for National Chicken Month”.

I just smiled and waved as she made her way past the gate and toward her rental unit. Not knowing whether to believe the “National Chicken Month” thing, I decided to do some investigating… 

September is indeed National Chicken Month !                                             

Look around America — Chicken’s everywhere! Whether it’s broiled, baked, fried or added to our soup, we can’t seem to get enough. In fact, Smithsonian Magazine recently called chicken “the ubiquitous food of our era, crossing multiple cultural boundaries with ease.” Still, we don’t often stop to appreciate this delicious protein source. 

CHICKEN TIMELINE

1930
“Secret blend of herbs and spices” – The first Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) was established in North Corbin, Kentucky.

1967
The American creation of chicken Cordon Bleu made its debut as an airline food.

July 29, 1977
The first National Chicken Wing Day – Guess which city came up with this. Hint: Ever heard of “Buffalo” wings?

1979
“I’m lovin’ it.” McDonald’s introduces their chicken nuggets.

HOW TO CELEBRATE NATIONAL CHICKEN MONTH!

Host a chicken potluck
Invite some friends over. The only requirement here is that every dish should incorporate chicken in some way.

Go out for chicken and waffles
Whether dining out for chicken and waffles on Sunday is part of your weekly routine, or if you’ve never even tried it before, National Chicken Month is the perfect time to order a plate of this sweet and savory goodness.

Learn a new recipe
There are seemingly endless ways to prepare chicken, so during this month, make it a point to learn how to make a recipe you’ve never tried before. It’s always fun to add a new dish to your repertoire.

5 FINGER LICKIN’ CHICKEN FACT NUGGETS

1. The average American eats around 83 pounds of chicken per year.

2. Chicken is the most widely consumed form of poultry throughout the entire world.

3. In 2019, over 1.25 billion chicken wings were consumed during Super Bowl weekend.

4. For chicken soup manufacturers, cold and flu season generates over half of their revenue.

5. Over half of the entrées ordered in U.S. restaurants are for some form of chicken dish.

WHY WE LOVE CHICKEN 

Chicken’s easy to find
Check out just about any grocery store or restaurant menu, and you’re sure to find chicken somewhere. It’s practically always available and affordable.

Chicken’s good for your brain

Chicken is high in Vitamin B, which is linked to promoting psychological health. This essential nutrient also helps fight off anxiety, stress, and even memory loss.

It’s yummy!
People all over the world have unique and authentic ways to prepare poultry, so whether you’re in the mood for chicken fried rice, chicken marsala, or crispy fried chicken, your taste buds are in for a treat.

So there you have it. A few informative “chicken nuggets” related to National Chicken Month, courtesy of The Storage Inn. Now get out there and celebrate, and if your in the neighborhood, I’ll have an order of hot wings with extra celery and bleu cheese please!

 

 

Storing your Tailgate Party

So, September has arrived here at The Storage Inn in South Jersey, along with a brand-spanking-new football season – and what fun would football be without tailgating? There’s nothing like meeting up with your friends, firing up the grill, and getting pumped up before kickoff – but this yearly ritual also comes with a fair amount of work attached. The last thing you want, is to be running around scrambling to find your tailgating gear on game day. Here are some tips to help you stay organized, and make your tailgating  adventure a bit easier.

Keep it Clean

Whether you’re putting it away just until next week, or until next season or packing up for the season and placing your vacation stuff into a storage facility until next year, be sure to thoroughly clean all of your gear before you put it into storage – especially anything that might have food residue on it.The smallest amount of food residue can easily attract insects, and rodents. Consider pressure washing your grill at regular intervals throughout the football season, and especially at the end of the season, when you put it into your storage unit.

Tote It

Typical tailgating gear can include everything from team flags, to plastic utensils, table cloths, cups, radios, and more!  This is where plastic tote bins become your best friend. Not only will they hold just about everything that you need, but they’ll also stack nicely in your game day vehicle –  just be sure to distribute the weight evenly so that they’re not too heavy to lift. This also makes for easy placement back into your garage or storage unit after the big game.

Be Safe

Do not store hazardous or flammable materials such as propane tanks, lighter fluid, or any other flammable materials in your garage or self storage unit. Propane tanks should be stored outdoors in an upright position. Other items such as lighter fluid or fire starters should be stored at home in a secure  temperature controlled area.  Also remember to remove batteries from radios, flashlights, etc., while in storage between seasons, to avoid leakage.

Make it Easy

Whether you’re a football-only tailgater, or a year round baseball, soccer, NASCAR kind of crew, part of successful tailgating is having a system that makes it easy.  You will want to be sure that your tailgating items can be easily accessed. If you find that you’re having a hard time doing this at home, you may want to consider a small self storage unit. The ease of driving up, throwing open the door, and loading your vehicle, could make the small monthly investment well worth it! Stop in to your local self-storage facility like The Storage Inn and check it out – We’d be more than happy to help you. Happy Tailgating!

 

Beat the Heat: Summer Safety Tips for Seniors

The Storage Inn Blog About Staying Hydrated for Storage Rental Customers

Beat the Heat: Summer Safety Tips for Seniors

It’s mid-August here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and although we are in the midst of a heatwave, our storage facility is as busy as ever, with storage customers out and about, occasionally stopping into the rental office for a complimentary bottle of cold spring water!

Today, one of our most senior customers, Beatrice (age 87), stopped in for a bottle of water on her way back to her storage unit.

“ Hello Beatrice – Hot one today !”, I proclaimed as I handed her a bottle of ice cold water.

“Sure is – you know it’s hot when the temperature is higher than my age!” she quipped.

We had the usual conversation about the heat, and how we would be complaining about the cold soon enough. Beatrice smiled and waved goodbye as she headed to her car. This made me think… How would I handle the heat at age 87?

Here are some helpful hot weather tips for seniors!

Stay hydrated
Elderly individuals have a harder time knowing when they are dehydrated, so, they are more prone to heat stroke.Seniors also lose the ability to conserve water as they age. Avoid drinks containing caffeine and alcohol, as they will further dehydrate you. 

Dress appropriately
Loose-fitting and light-colored clothes will keep you cool and not absorb as much heat from the sun. It’s best to wear breathable fabrics, such as cotton, to help regulate your temperature.  A broad hat and sunglasses will keep the sun’s rays out of your face and eyes.

Wear sunscreen
This is especially pertinent for seniors, as many prescription medications make your skin more sensitive to the sun. Applying a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher will help you avoid sunburn.

Stay out of the sun
Check the forecast and avoid prolonged time in the sun, especially on days where the temperature reaches above 90 degrees. Try to plan any outside activities for the early morning or in twilight hours after the sun sets.

Spend time in air-conditioned places
If you want to get out of the house while avoiding the heat (or if your house isn’t air-conditioned), look for activities in spots with AC. Go see a movie with the grandkids, or read a book at the library. A walk around the mall or a class at your local senior center are great ways to get exercise indoors.

Know when to cool down
If you’re feeling heated, take a tepid (not too hot or cold) bath or shower to cool down. You can also use cool washcloths on the neck, wrist, and armpits. Seniors are at a higher risk of heat-related illnesses. Poor circulation, heart disease, high blood pressure, and the inability to perspire due to certain medications present further complications.

HEAT RELATED WARNING SIGNS 

Health Problem Definition Warning Signs
Dehydration A loss of water in the body Weakness, headache, muscle cramps, dizziness, confusion, passing out
Heat Stroke Dangerous rise in body temperature Temperature of 103 or higher; red, hot, dry skin; fast pulse; headache; dizziness; nausea or vomiting; confusion; passing out
Heat Exhaustion Caused by too much heat and dehydration and may lead to heat stroke Heavy sweating or no sweating, muscle cramps, tiredness, weakness, paleness, cold or clammy skin, dizziness, headache, nausea or vomiting, fast and weak pulse, fainting
Heat Syncope Fainting caused by high temperatures Dizziness or fainting

In summary, seniors should protect themselves from the summer heat by staying hydrated, staying cool, and, if you must go outside – dress appropriately and wear sunscreen!

Thanks for taking the time to read this post! The staff here at The Storage Inn will continue to do our part by offering our storage customers free cold spring water, and a chance to cool off in our complimentary, air-conditioned tenant office area. Happy Heatwave everyone – stay safe!

 

Happy Heat Wave!

Melting Ice Cream in the Hot Sun

The Storage Inn’s latest blog post is about high temperatures and fun facts related to them.

It’s late July here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and we are currently experiencing our third heat wave of the summer. It’s hot hot hot, but as I was reminded by one of our storage tenants, all things are relative.

As I was making my rounds of the self storage facility this morning, I saw one of our long-time tenants, Mr. Osborne, working at his storage unit. Mr Osborne travels back and forth between his home in New Jersey and his home in Florida. “It’s a hot one!” I chirped. Mr. Osborne’s reply caught me somewhat off-guard – “Nah… In Florida we call this spring!”  As I drove back to the rental office, I began to think about how hot it must be in other parts of the world, so I decided to do a little digging. 

Here are some fun facts about hot weather…

  1. The highest temperature ever recorded in the shade was 136 degrees in Libya on September 13, 1922.
  1. The skin of a polar bear is black, which helps it to absorb more of the heat from the sun.
  1. According to NASA, when the temperature reaches 95 degrees our work output drops by 45 per cent.
  1. “As cool as a cucumber” is an apt simile: The inside of a cucumber can be as much as 20 degrees cooler than the outside temperature.
  1. The average temperature on Mars is -81 degrees.
  1. According to ‘Dolbear’s Law’, you can calculate the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit by counting the number of chirps produced in 14 seconds by a cricket and adding 40.
  1. Until they are needed, the balls at Wimbledon are stored in refrigerated containers at 68F.
  1. The flapping of the wings of 1,000 bees generates seven watts of heat.
  1. The first use of the term “heatwave” for a period of hot weather was in New York in 1892.
  1. The World Meteorological Organization’s definition of a heatwave is when temperatures are over 9 degrees above average for five days in a row.

So, now you’ll be armed with some fun facts for this weekend’s BBQ. When your neighbor starts to complain about the heat, you can ask him if he’d rather be in Libya! Meanwhile, here at The Storage Inn, I will be cranking up the air-conditioning in the rental office, hoping for Mars-like conditions!

Happy Heat Wave!

 

The Storage Inn investigates the history of the American Hot Dog!

Hot Diggity Dog!

It’s Mid-July here at The Storage Inn self storage in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, and It’s been very busy with customers running to and from their storage spaces. Most are retrieving summer items such as barbecue grills, lawn chairs, bicycles and even surfboards.

Just today, one of our storage customers, Carl, stopped in the office for a complimentary bottle of cold spring water, and was proud to announce to us that he had just purchased 200 hot dogs for his annual Hot Dog and Beer Barbecue party!

“Wow – a hot dog and beer party – sounds like fun! “ I said. “Yeah, we do it every year. We supply the hot dogs and beer, and all of our friends bring a side dish or anything else they wanna eat or drink. Always a great time!” Carl replied.

As Carl strode out of the eht storage rental office, I began to think…

“Wow, that’s a lot of hot dogs! – I wonder how many hot dogs Americans actually eat?” And what about that old saying folks like to use… “American as hot dogs and apple pie?”

“Did we invent hot dogs? “ I pondered. I decided to do some digging, and here’s what I found.

  • Between Memorial Day and Labor Day, Americans consume seven billion hot dogs!
  • The most popular condiment is mustard. Then come onions, chili, ketchup, relish, and sauerkraut.
  • Nathan Handwerker opened Nathan’s Famous Hot Dogs (which remains a Coney Island institution) in 1916.
  • To counteract the stories of unhealthy ingredients in hot dogs, Handwerker hired men to wear surgeon’s smocks and eat lunch in his restaurants.
  • The largest seller of hot dogs is 7-Eleven, with 100 million served annually.
  • If you ask for a “hot dog” in New Zealand, you’ll get it battered on a stick like a corn dog. To get one on a bun, you have to ask for an “American hot dog.”
  • A “Chicago-style” hot dog never includes ketchup.
  • According to Guinness, the most expensive hot dogs ever were 3/4-pound, 18-inch dogs sold for charity in 2012 at a Sacramento, California, restaurant. Topped with an impressive array of fancy condiments—moose milk cheese, maple-syrup bacon, organic baby greens, whole-grain mustard, and cranberries—the dogs cost $145.49 each, with proceeds donated to a children’s hospital.

  • The most hot dogs (with buns) consumed by one person in 10 minutes: 72 – Joey Chestnut holds the record set July 4th, 2017.
  • The world’s longest hot dog stretched 196.85 feet and was prepared by Japan’s Shizuoka Meat Producers in 2006.
  • In the 1880s or ’90s, frankfurters (from Germany) and wieners (from Austria) became known as “hot dogs”—possibly because of the sausages’ similarities to dachshunds .

So, there you have it – a little hot dog history! I never know what I’m going to learn talking to our customers here at The Storage Inn. Well, I’ve got to go – I have a sudden craving for a chili cheese dog and an ice cold beer!

 

July 4th – Independence Day – Fun Facts

Summer is here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and our storage space customers are preparing for the Independence Day Holiday, shuttling in and out past the rental office, retrieving barbecue grills, lawn furniture, and even the occasional kayak. I’m certain our staff, and storage space tenants could tell you that July 4th commemorates our nation’s freedom and the signing of the Declaration of Independence, but they may not know these facts about the 4th of July.

Here are a few July 4th fun facts for you courtesy of The Storage Inn…

Only John Hancock actually signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. All the others signed sometime in August..

The average age of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence was 45. The youngest was Thomas Lynch, Jr (27) of South Carolina.  The oldest delegate was Benjamin Franklin (70) of Pennsylvania. The lead author of The Declaration, Thomas Jefferson, was 33.

The Declaration of Independence was signed by 56 men from 13 colonies.One out of every eight signers of the Declaration of Independence were educated at Harvard (7 total).

The only two signers of the Declaration of Independence who later served as President of the United States were John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

The stars on the original American flag were in a circle so all the Colonies would appear equal.

The first Independence Day celebration took place in Philadelphia on July 8, 1776. This was also the day that the Declaration of Independence was first read in public after people were summoned by the ringing of the Liberty Bell.

The White House held its first 4th July party in 1801.

President John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe all died on the Fourth. Adams and Jefferson (both signed the Declaration) died on the same day within hours of each other in 1826.

Benjamin Franklin proposed the turkey as the national bird but was overruled by John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, who recommended the bald eagle.

In 1776, there were 2.5 million people living in the new nation. Today the population of the U.S.A. is over 300 million.

Congress made Independence Day an official unpaid holiday for federal employees in 1870. In 1938, Congress changed Independence Day to a paid federal holiday.

Over 200 million dollars are spent on fireworks annually in the United States with most being imported from China.

Approximately 150 million hot dogs and 700 million pounds of chicken are consumed  on the fourth of July

Every 4th of July the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia is tapped (not actually rung) thirteen times in honor of the original thirteen colonies.

The song “Yankee Doodle” was originally sung by British military officers to mock the disheveled, disorganized colonial “Yankees” with whom they served in the French and Indian War.

The tune of The Star Spangled Banner was originally that of an English drinking song called “To Anacreon in Heaven.”

So there you have it – some fun facts to entertain friends and family as you hang out at the beach or barbecue. Have a great 4th and remember to toast the Chinese for inventing fireworks!