Baby, It’s Hot Outside!

Happy August everyone! Here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, the temps are soaring along with the humidity. Our storage space customers, however, seem to be immune to this weather as they check in on their storage rental spaces, retrieving various Summer fun time items. Yesterday I noticed one of our storage tenants, Bob, outside his storage rental unit with giant black inner tubes over each shoulder and carrying a large cooler. “What are you up to?” I shouted from my golf cart. “We’re going tubing – If we don’t sweat to death first!” came Bob’s reply. “ Yep – Dog days of summer!” I yelled back.

 

Bob threw the inner tubes and the cooler in the back of his pickup truck and drove away, leading me to wonder if one really could sweat to death, and what the heck does the saying “Dog days of summer” actually mean? I decided to look into this matter and came up with a handful of Summer sayings that needed some clarification.

Dog Days of Summer
I always assumed that this saying referred to the weather being so hot that even the family dog did not want to move out of his resting spot. But, it turns out that the “dog days of summer” are the hot, sultry days of summer that coincide with the heliacal rising of the star Sirius (also known as the dog star) from late July to late August.

It’s hot enough to fry an egg on the sidewalk
Sure, the sidewalk gets hot, but it’s unlikely to cook the egg much, if at all. If you really want to fry an egg outside on a hot day,
you might have better luck with the hood of a car. Metal conducts heat better and gets much hotter.

Have a hot drink to cool you down?
On a scorching summer day, you’re probably more likely to grab an iced coffee than a steaming cup of joe. But a study has shown that drinking a hot beverage on a hot day actually can cool  you down. Consuming a hot drink does add heat to your body, but that heat actually increases the rate at which you sweat, which can help cool you off. The sweat has to evaporate in order for you to feel cooler, so, if you’re wearing shorts and a t-shirt, hot coffee might actually cool you off more than a glass of ice-cold coffee.

It’s not the heat, it’s the humidity
There’s a reason for the adage: It’s not the heat, it’s the humidity. “It’s really the dew point that is the measure of how humans feel outside,” according to Carlie Buccola, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service. When the dew point or humidity is high, that means the air is already saturated with moisture and your sweat has a harder time evaporating. So, it’s really both – heat without humidity can be bearable, as can a cool day with some moisture in the air.

I’m sweating to death!

Is it possible to sweat to death? Literally no. Sort of yes. The cause of death in every single human death is exactly the same. Lack of oxygen to the brain. Sweating is fluid being taken from your blood, and pushed out of your skin to cool you off when your body feels like its core temp is too high. Your body will lose the ability to sweat after your fluid level reaches a certain point, and your kidneys have gone into refiltration mode. (kidneys stop filtering urine down, and hold on to excess fluid in a desperate attempt to save your life) So no – it’s not possible to sweat to death. And even if you could, the cause of death would still be lack of blood to the brain.

So, there you have it, some interesting facts about summer sayings courtesy of The Storage Inn. As for me, I’m going to fix myself a nice big cup of hot coffee before I sweat to death!  

 

 

July is National Picnic Month!

July is National Picnic Month!

Summer is in full swing here at The Storage Inn In Egg Harbor Township New Jersey,  and our storage rental tenants are busy retrieving summer items from their rental spaces. Today I saw one of our long-time tenants pulling a giant picnic basket and blanket out of her storage space.

She informed me that July is National Picnic Month.  “What a great way to take a break from the current world situation!” I replied as we went our separate ways.

I began to wonder – Where did the idea of the picnic originate? Could it be simply an instinctual holdover from when primitive people lived outdoors? Here are some picnic facts that you may find interesting…

Picnic History

The start of this simple tradition may date back to hunting expeditions of the Middle Ages. Hunters would bring a meal to enjoy in the great outdoors. We can imagine a medieval hunting party taking an afternoon break in the shade of oak trees and enjoying a simple meal before continuing their expedition.

The earliest form of the word ‘picnic’ didn’t appear until 1692 – and was first documented in the French language. Then in 1748, a little more than 50 years later, the term found its way into the English language in a letter from Lord Chesterfield to his son, in reference to an outdoor social get-together.

From then on picnics have been held on blankets, in lawn chairs, aboard boats, and at picnic tables on both sides of the Atlantic. The term is now synonymous with relaxed outdoor dining, time spent with a special someone or a large group of friends, and simple fare like sandwiches or hot items fresh off the park grill.

A checked red-and-white blanket, a wicker basket, and an open patch of grass may be the quintessential concept of the classic picnic. But imagine trying to enjoy an afternoon of delight with these classic components – and three hungry children in tow, plus Grandma, a puppy dog, and a sore back from sitting in an office chair all week. That patch of grass may not be looking so inviting after all.

Upgrading to Tables

Enter a modern convenience often taken for granted: picnic tables. All of the wrinkles in your picnic problem have suddenly been released. Give the kids a spot to sit on the benches along either side of the table – and now Grandma has a spot to rest too. The dog stays out of the way of the tempting treats. And you can spread out the feast, then take a place at the picnic table yourself. With your meal above ground zero, you’ll spend less time combating the army of ants, too!

Classic fables evoke images of Robin Hood and his friends dining under trees during ‘picnics,’ but thousands of park-goers during National Picnic month will skip the storybook setting and opt to enjoy their meal on a picnic table in their favorite park.

Picnic Tips

The beautiful thing about a picnic is its versatility. Make it simple or sophisticated. Spend days planning the perfect party, or minutes packing the essentials for some impromptu fun! But no matter which route you go in your picnic planning, here are some tips for a perfect picnic

Keep an Eye on the Sky –  Summer showers can put a damper on your picnic plans, so check the weather for the day of your picnic. If it looks like a light shower might be rolling through, choose a park with covered picnic tables to serve as a back-up plan in the event of rain. But beware of thunderstorms – and stay safe if lightning has been spotted in the area.

Keep it Clean –  Don’t leave your trash behind and ruin the park experience for others. Keep an eye on wrappers, napkins, and paper cups which can easily be blown away by a breeze. Bring a small bag to collect refuse, and make use of trash receptacles in your local park. Remember, litter encourages more litter and a few paper plates on the ground could start a landslide of trash.

Cold is Cool  –  The summer season is a perfect time for picnics, but the warm temperatures mean that you’ll want to take extra precautions to keep your food from spoiling. Bring along plenty of ice packs and a cooler to store food and condiments in. If you’re making hot food fresh on the park grill, then don’t let it linger too long in the hot summer sun after you’ve cooked it.

Try a New View –  Celebrate National Picnic month by choosing a new spot for your outdoor feast. Whether it’s a park in your local community or a destination you’ll need to put in a little effort to reach, you’ll be rewarded with new views as you enjoy your meal. 

Pack up and picnic on!

So what are you waiting for? The staff here at The Storage Inn wishes you a happy rest of the summer – Whether you choose to dine in the grass, or on a picnic table, pack up and picnic on!

July 4th – Independence Day – Fun Facts

Summer is here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and our storage space customers are preparing for the Independence Day Holiday, shuttling in and out past the rental office, retrieving barbecue grills, lawn furniture, and even the occasional kayak. I’m certain our staff, and storage space tenants could tell you that July 4th commemorates our nation’s freedom and the signing of the Declaration of Independence, but they may not know these facts about the 4th of July.

Here are a few July 4th fun facts for you courtesy of The Storage Inn…

Only John Hancock actually signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. All the others signed sometime in August..

The average age of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence was 45. The youngest was Thomas Lynch, Jr (27) of South Carolina.  The oldest delegate was Benjamin Franklin (70) of Pennsylvania. The lead author of The Declaration, Thomas Jefferson, was 33.

The Declaration of Independence was signed by 56 men from 13 colonies.One out of every eight signers of the Declaration of Independence were educated at Harvard (7 total).

The only two signers of the Declaration of Independence who later served as President of the United States were John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

The stars on the original American flag were in a circle so all the Colonies would appear equal.

The first Independence Day celebration took place in Philadelphia on July 8, 1776. This was also the day that the Declaration of Independence was first read in public after people were summoned by the ringing of the Liberty Bell.

The White House held its first 4th July party in 1801.

President John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe all died on the Fourth. Adams and Jefferson (both signed the Declaration) died on the same day within hours of each other in 1826.

Benjamin Franklin proposed the turkey as the national bird but was overruled by John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, who recommended the bald eagle.

In 1776, there were 2.5 million people living in the new nation. Today the population of the U.S.A. is over 300 million.

Congress made Independence Day an official unpaid holiday for federal employees in 1870. In 1938, Congress changed Independence Day to a paid federal holiday.

Over 200 million dollars are spent on fireworks annually in the United States with most being imported from China.

Approximately 150 million hot dogs and 700 million pounds of chicken are consumed  on the fourth of July

Every 4th of July the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia is tapped (not actually rung) thirteen times in honor of the original thirteen colonies.

The song “Yankee Doodle” was originally sung by British military officers to mock the disheveled, disorganized colonial “Yankees” with whom they served in the French and Indian War.

The tune of The Star Spangled Banner was originally that of an English drinking song called “To Anacreon in Heaven.”

So there you have it – some fun facts to entertain friends and family as you hang out at the beach or barbecue. Have a great 4th and remember to toast the Chinese for inventing fireworks!

Summertime Storage and Fun Summer Facts!

Hello Summer Storage

Summertime Storage and Fun Summer Facts!

Summer is officially here in Egg Harbor Township, NJ and The Storage Inn is bustling with warm weather activity. Landscaping storage customers are shooting in and out, retrieving items from their storage spaces. Families are grabbing barbecue grills, surfboards, and bicycles from their summer storage rentals, and I even saw one of our younger self storage tenants on roller blades!

Everybody loves to be busy in summer! To celebrate, I’d like to share a few interesting facts about summer with our readers.

  1. In the United States, the top 5 most popular summer vacations are
    – Beach/ocean (45%)
    – A famous city (42%)
    – National parks (21%)
    – A lake (17%)
    – A resort (14%) 

2. The “dog days of summer” refer to the weeks between July 3 and August 11 and are named after the Dog Star (Sirius) in the Canis Major constellation. The ancient Greeks blamed Sirius for the hot temperatures, drought, discomfort, and sickness that occurred during the summer. 

3. In the summer heat, the iron in France’s Eiffel Tower expands, making the tower grow more than 6 inches. 

4. The month of June was named after Juno, the wife of Jupiter. July is named after Julius Caesar, and August after Caesar Augustus. 

5. The first Olympic Games in the modern era were the 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the Olympiad in Athens, Greece. The Games featured the Panathinaiko Stadium, the first giant stadium of the modern world that housed the largest crowd to ever watch a sporting event. 

6. Watermelon, a summer time favorite, is part of the cucumber, pumpkin, and squash family and consists of 92% water. On average, Americans consume 15 pounds of watermelon annually. 

7. The popsicle, another summer time treat, was accidentally invented by an 11-year-old boy in San Francisco in 1905 during the cooler part of the year. He left a glass of soda sitting outside and by the next morning it had frozen solid. A little time later in life he began selling them at an amusement park in New Jersey. Cherry is the number 1 popsicle flavor in the United States.

8. Before the Civil War, schools did not have summer vacation. In rural communities, kids had school off during the spring planting and fall harvest while urban schools were essentially year-round. The long summer holiday didn’t come about until the early 20th century. 

9. The record for the most people applying sunscreen was on January 8, 2012, in Australia with 1,006 participants applying sunscreen for 2 minutes. 

There you have it – A few things that you may not have known about Summer! Happy Summer everyone from all of us here at The Storage Inn!

 

Top 5 Reason We Keep So Much Stuff

Americans love to keep “stuff”. As the manager at The Storage Inn of Egg Harbor Township New Jersey this is something that I can attest to firsthand!

Our self-storage customers love to keep their “stuff”. Many items definitely get used again, but some will not be — so why do we keep these extra items? 

A recent survey asked that question and 94% of the people had surprisingly similar answers. The top 5 reasons that people say they keep too much extra stuff are.

1. “I might need it sometime”

I have a friend who has a storage unit that includes a box of size 30 jeans. He is currently a 36 inch waist. He is in his 50’s, and does not exercise.  He will never need those jeans again!

2. “Sentimental Value”

I can certainly understand storing items of sentimental value — photos, awards, family heirlooms, etc. Sometimes we feel that we are discarding our fond memories of the past and don’t want to let them go.

3. “I’m going to sell it “

A friend of mine has a pile of stuff stored in one corner of his garage that he has kept for years with the intention of selling it. These items include a punch bowl set,  a VHS tape rewinder, and a rooftop TV antenna. The best salesman in the world could not sell these items!

4. “Feeling guilty”

Even though they’ll never use it, some people feel guilty discarding items that might be best thrown away. We’ve all seen the tv shows highlighting extreme cases of hoarders keeping too much stuff. Sometimes, it can be liberating to detach yourself from items that you no longer need.

5. “I can use it as a gift “

This is a great one — re-gifting! New or unopened items that you have no desire to keep for yourself, but somehow think that a friend or family member would be thrilled to receive as a gift.

There you have it, the top 5 reasons people say they keep too much stuff. So then, if you’re like 94% of everyone else out there, who loves to keep extra stuff, just because, stop by The Storage Inn because we would be more than happy to help you with all your storage needs!

Look Twice – Save a Life!

It’s mid-May here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and we are starting to get some warm, almost summer-like days. This time of year the air is filled with the sounds of nature… and motorcycles!

Yes, our tenants are retrieving their two-wheeled toys from their storage units and getting out there to enjoy the open road. I was reminded by one of our self storage customers that May is National Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.

Motorcycle Awareness Month is aimed at increasing awareness among drivers of all types of vehicles to drive responsibly and take heed of motorcycles sharing the roadway. Warmer weather brings out motorcycle lovers in droves! City streets, back roads, and highways are buzzing with motorcycling enthusiasts. This time of year demands more attention from motorcyclists and car drivers alike.

All Drivers Have Responsibility to Keep Motorcyclists Safe

Although motorcycles account for only 3% of all vehicles in the USA, they hold the same rights on the road as any other motorist. In many states, there are strong initiatives to educate motorcycle drivers and riders to take safety measures to avoid dangerous traffic situations and accidents.

Unfortunately, the same amount of emphasis regarding motorcycle safety is not taken with drivers of other vehicle types. It may seem unnecessary to do, but with motorcyclists being at a higher risk of injury and fatality in the event of a crash, it is an important matter to bring to the forefront.

A common prejudice among American drivers is the idea that motorcyclists ride at their own risk.  The risks associated with motorcycling, while true, do not remove the responsibility of passenger car drivers to practice safe driving habits like using turn signals and avoiding distracted driving.

Here are some great driving  awareness reminders:

  • Listen! Those loud pipes on motorcycles are not there just to be cool – they are also to alert other drivers that there is a motorcycle nearby.
  • Give full lane space to motorcycles, same as a full size car.
  • Check blind spots, look twice and signal when making turns, merging with traffic, and changing lanes.
  • When behind a motorcycle, leave extra space to allow for sudden breaking.
  • For the safety of everyone on the road, avoid distracted, drunk, and drowsy driving.

Motorcyclist – Take Charge of Your Safety on the Road

While most states require a test to receive a motorcycle license, a motorcycle safety course is also highly recommended. These courses can be taken through the state and are available at most motorcycle dealerships.

Are some tips for motorcyclists to help enjoy a safe ride:

  • Always wear a DOT-compliant helmet and use bright color and fluorescent gear to make yourself more visible – white helmets can lower risk by 24%.
  • Drive with your headlights turned on even during the day. Visibility to other drivers is key
  • Drive in the middle of the lane to become more visible to the traffic as opposed to straddling the lane divider lines.
  • Use caution while approaching an intersection, over-taking, or changing lanes.
  • Avoid lane splitting or driving aggressively, especially in heavier traffic.
  • Take a motorcycle safety and driving course to improve your riding skills
  • Use your hand and turn signal to inform others that you are taking a turn or changing lane.
  • For the safety of everyone on the road, avoid distracted, drunk, and drowsy driving.

Safety gear is an important part of rider’s safety.The leather worn by motorcyclist, while it may look cool, is really a second skin to protect the driver. Motorcyclists should enjoy the ride, but be prepared for the worst

 

  • Always wear a helmet – the leading cause death in motorcycle fatalities is head trauma 
  • Wear leather gloves – hands can sustain a lot of trauma during a motorcycle crash
  • Wear boots – Protect your feet and ankles from the road as well as hot engine parts
  • Leather jackets not only look cool, but are a rider’s “Second Skin” and can prevent a lot of damage in the case of an accident.
  • The type of pants worn are just as important as the jacket. Wear something that will protect your legs against “Road Rash “.

Motorcycle safety is the responsibility of everyone on the road; car and truck drivers, motorcyclists, and pedestrians. Awareness  from both the drivers and riders is required to make our roads safe for motorcycles, not only during Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, but all year round. The most common reason given by automobile drivers who are involved in an accident with the motorcycle is “ I didn’t see him”. Listen, and look twice – it could save someone’s life!

Whether you are on two wheels, or four, the staff here at The Storage Inn wishes you a great warm-weather season, and Happy Motoring!

April Showers and Other Weather Sayings

Storage Inn Blog post about Weather Sayings

April Showers and other Weather Sayings

Things are fairly quiet here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey. For the most part, our storage rental customers are observing the stay-at-home guidelines, however, we are happy to allow them access to retrieve essential items from their storage rental units.

As I sit here in the rental office watching the weather outside and wondering if it’s gonna rain, I hear the voice on the radio say “ Well you know – April showers bring May flowers!”.

While this seemed to make sense to me, it also made me wonder about some other weather-related sayings that might need a little explanation.

Long before meteorologists reported the weather, people made forecasts based on their observations of the sky, animals, and nature.

Many of the traditional sayings they used, called proverbs, are surprisingly accurate. Try out some old-fashioned forecasting—that still works today!  Here are some weather sayings and meanings courtesy of the Farmers Almanac.

“RED SKY AT NIGHT, SAILORS DELIGHT. RED SKY IN MORNING, SAILORS TAKE WARNING.”

A reddish sunset means that the air is dusty and dry. Since weather in North American latitudes usually moves from west to east, a red sky at sunset means dry weather is moving east and that’s good for sailing. Conversely, a reddish sunrise means that dry air from the west has already passed over us moving east and clearing the way for a storm to move in.

“THE HIGHER THE CLOUDS, THE FINER THE WEATHER.”

If you spot wispy, thin clouds way up high where the jet airplanes fly, expect a spell of pleasant weather. Keep an eye, however, on the smaller puff clouds (cumulus), especially if it’s in the morning or early afternoon. If the rounded tops of these clouds, which have flat bases, grow higher than the one cloud’s width, then there’s a chance of a thunderstorm forming.

“CLEAR MOON, FROST SOON.”

When the night sky is clear, Earth’s surface cools rapidly—there is no cloud cover to keep the heat in. If the night is clear enough to see the Moon and the temperature drops enough, frost will form. Expect a chilly morning!

“CLOUDS LIKE TOWERS MEAN FREQUENT SHOWERS.”

When you spy large, white clouds that look like cauliflower or castles in the sky, there is probably lots of dynamic weather going on inside. Innocent clouds look like billowy cotton, not towers. If the clouds start to swell and take on a gray tint, they’re probably turning into thunderstorms. Watch out!

“RAINBOW IN THE MORNING GIVES YOU FAIR WARNING.”

A rainbow in the morning indicates that a shower is in your near future.

“WHEN DEW IS ON THE GRASS, NO RAIN SHALL COME TO PASS.”

Morning dew is a sign that the previous night’s skies were clear, with no wind and decreasing temperatures. Clear, dry, windless conditions usually continue through the daytime.

“RING AROUND THE MOON? RAIN (OR SNOW) REAL SOON.”

A ring around the moon usually indicates an advancing warm front, which means precipitation. Under those conditions, high, thin clouds get lower and thicker as they pass over the moon. Ice crystals are reflected by the moon’s light, causing a halo to appear.

“RAIN FORETOLD, LONG LAST – SHORT NOTICE, SOON WILL PASS.”

If you find yourself toting an umbrella around for days “just in case,” rain will stick around for several hours when it finally comes. The gray overcast dominating the horizon means a large area is affected. Conversely, if you get caught in a surprise shower, it’s likely to be short-lived.

“A YEAR OF SNOW – CROPS WILL GROW.” 

A several-inch layer of snow contains more air than ice. Trapped between the interlocking snowflakes, the air serves to insulate the plants beneath it. When the snow melts, the water helps to keep the ground moist.

Observe the sky and see if these weather proverbs work for you. That’s it from the crew here at The Storage Inn – wishing you only the best weather and the best of times ahead!

CDC Cleaning and Disinfecting Tips

The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey is allowing access to current self storage tenants to retrieve essential items that may be needed during this uncertain time of the coronavirus pandemic.

However, we’ve found that most of our storage rental customers are opting to follow the “stay at home” and “social distancing” parameters issued by the state and federal governments . 

Due to the virus outbreak and the resulting shutdown of many public places, people are getting restless and looking for things to do around their homes. Given the circumstances, one of the biggest no-brainers is spring cleaning and disinfecting.

Here are a few tips from the Centers for Disease Control on how to disinfect your home. Cleaning and disinfecting are two very different things.

The CDC recommends we all do a bit of both, even if nobody in your home is sick.

Cleaning is about removing contaminants from a surface.

Disinfecting is about killing pathogens.

Do both daily if anything or anyone has entered or exited your home.

Person-to-person transmission is a much greater risk than transmission via surfaces, but the CDC recommends we clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in our homes at least once daily.

Target Your Home’s High-Touch Surfaces

COVID-19  is capable of living on surfaces such as cardboard for 24 hours, but up to two or three days on plastic and stainless steel. So cleaning and disinfecting high-touch surfaces is a step we should all take.

High-Touch Surfaces to Clean and Disinfect Daily:

Doorknobs, table surfaces, hard dining chairs (seat, back, and arms), kitchen counters, bathroom counters, faucets and faucet knobs, toilets (seat and handle), light switches, TV remote controls, game controllers, and any other surfaces that you come in contact with frequently.

First Clean, Then Disinfect:

First, clean the surfaces, removing any contaminants, dust, or debris with soapy water (or a cleaning spray) and a hand towel.

Then apply a surface-appropriate disinfectant using disinfecting wipes or disinfectant spray.

If a disinfectant product has an indication for killing influenza, RSB, SARS virus, or other coronaviruses, then it should work against COVID19.

Disinfectants:

Disinfecting wipes (Clorox, Lysol, or store brand will do)

Disinfectant spray (Purell, Clorox, Lysol, all make sprays that will work)

Isopropyl alcohol

Hydrogen peroxide

Does the Laundry Machine Work on Clothes?

Yes – Wash your clothing with regular laundry soap and drying them at a higher temperature than you might have otherwise is all you have to do to disinfect your clothes.

Be sure to disinfect surfaces the laundry comes in contact with, including the hamper and your hands—especially if you have a sick person in the house.

Don’t forget to clean your coat and backpack. Wiping the inside off with a disinfectant wipe should do the trick unless your jacket is machine washable.

Should You Disinfect Packages and Mail?

According to the USPS, mail and packages are relatively low-risk for transmitting the coronavirus, and packages from China pose no special risk compared to packages from anywhere else. That said, researchers have found that it can live on cardboard for around 24 hours, so giving packages a once over with a disinfecting wipe isn’t a bad idea.

How to Disinfect Your Devices

Your devices might be all that’s keeping you sane during your self-isolation but, as we all know, they’re magnets for germs. Disinfecting wipes are the best way to clean your devices, hands down. But some devices have special considerations.

How to Disinfect Your Phone or Tablet

Disinfect an iPhone or Android phone with a disinfecting wipe or alcohol solution (at least 70 percent). Make sure you pay special attention to the screen, the buttons, and anywhere dust and pocket lint tend to get trapped. Remove any case that’s on your phone or tablet, clean underneath, put it back on, and clean the outside. A once-daily disinfecting isn’t going to hurt your devices.

How to Disinfect Your Computer

Laptop displays aren’t always made of glass (matte displays are plastic) so avoid using a disinfecting wipe on the screen. Instead use isopropyl alcohol (70 percent) solution and a soft towel. Make sure you wipe down the keyboard, the trackpad, the exterior, and where your wrists rest on the laptop.

Most desktop computers are already in sore need for a cleaning. The best way to do that is with a disinfecting wipe or isopropyl alcohol solution and a soft towel. Again, avoid disinfecting wipes on the monitor. Make sure that you wipe down the mouse, keyboard, and mousepad.

Stay Home, Stay Safe

There’s a lot going on right now. It’s stressful. It’s scary. It can be hard to know what you should do or what’s going on. The staff here at The Storage Inn hopes that these tips may help you get through this trying time. Stay safe out there, and please, if you can, stay home.

Happy Saint Patrick's Day

A Short History of St. Patrick – The Storage Inn Blog

The Short History of Saint Patrick

It’s St. Patrick’s Day here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and the employees, and storage space renters alike are in a ”Luck o’ the Irish” mood! I’ve even had one couple stop into the front office dressed from head to toe in green. ”Happy St. Patty’s Day” they exclaimed – “Erin go bragh!”  I replied! That got me wondering about the origins of St. Patrick’s Day, so I decided to ask my “most Irish-looking” customers what they knew about Saint Patrick. It turns out that Sean, the husband, is not only Irish, but a history teacher too. “Well” he said, “for starters St. Patrick was neither Irish, nor a Saint. What???? – Did he at least invent green beer?!? No – he did not, but here is what he did do…

Patrick, whom almost everyone calls “Saint Patrick,” was never canonized by the Catholic Church, and was born to a wealthy family in 387 AD in Kilpatrick, Scotland. His real name was Maewyn Succat. It was his extensive missionary work in Ireland for which Patrick is famous. Patrick, at age sixteen, was captured by Irish raiders and spent several years as a slave in Ireland. It was during this time that he learned the various rituals, customs, and language of Druids, and it was these people that he eventually converted to Christianity. Patrick supposedly had a dream in which God spoke to him, saying, “Your ship is ready.” Patrick was then able to escape Ireland by ship. Shortly thereafter, he experienced another dream in which he received a letter that was labeled the “Voice of the Irish.” When he opened it, he heard the voices of all those whom he had met in Ireland begging him to return.

Patrick returned to Ireland to tell people about Christianity. Though the task was difficult and dangerous, he persisted and was able to build a strong foundation for conversion. The Irish people were receptive to his teachings, especially in light of the fact that he was able to take several of their Celtic symbols and “Christianize” them. The most well-known of Patrick’s illustrations is the shamrock, a certain type of clover sacred to the Druids, which he used as a symbol of the Trinity. During his thirty years of work there, he supposedly converted over 135,000 people, established 300 churches, and consecrated 350 bishops. Patrick died on March 17, 461. For over a millennium, the Irish have celebrated St. Patrick’s Day on March 17..

Each year millions of people celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. It’s a national holiday in Ireland where people do not work, but worship and gather with family. In the United States, the first St. Patrick’s Day parade was held in New York on March 17, 1762. It consisted largely of Irish soldiers. Today, St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated by wearing green, which symbolizes spring as well as Irish culture.

I thanked Sean and Erin for their brief, but insightful history lesson, and watched as they made their way back to their storage unit, presumably to retrieve some supplies for tonight’s St. Patrick’s Day festivities or maybe they were getting a jump on spring by pulling out St. Patrick’s favorite item to put into a storage unit… Paddy O’Furniture!! Is it time for that green beer yet? – Cheers!

Moving Season is Here!

March has arrived here at The Storage Inn self storage in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and we are beginning to see the yearly influx of storage renters who are in the process of moving from one home to another. 

Moving isn’t always the most fun, but there are things we can do to help minimize stress and make the move go smoothly.

Here are a few Storage Inn tips for Moving Day!

 

Make a list – Check it twice

Write it down! All of it. Create a simple record keeping system. Make a list of numbers with a space to write the contents. Place a number on EVERY box you pack and on your list, write the contents of the box under that number.This will make it much easier to find your items when you need them.

Pre-Pack

Anything you can pack ahead will save you time on moving day. Pre-pack everything that you won’t need in the days leading up to the move. If it’s summer, pack your winter clothes. Pack all your extra belongings such as decorative items and knick-knacks. Box up extra toiletries as well as kitchen utensils, pots and pans, etc. Use only the bare essentials for the last few days.­

Stock up on packing supplies

You’re going to need storage boxes. Probably more moving boxes than you think. Buying enough boxes ahead of time will make your life so much easier! Have about 10 boxes set aside to use on moving day for last minute items like bedding, clothes, and cleaning supplies. Use strong plastic packing tape to close up the boxes securely.  3M Shipping Tape or Uline Carton Sealing Tape are good brands. Use unprinted packing paper (newspaper can stain your items), or bubble wrap to wrap and cushion household goods, especially delicate items.

The Storage Inn carries a full line of packing supplies, including boxes, tape, bubble wrap, and more.

Pack Smart

Put all the things you’ll need first once you pull up to your new home in a clear plastic bin. Make sure this bin is placed at the back of your moving truck or car and easy to find right away. Includes things like a box cutter, paper towels, trash bags, eating utensils, select cookware, power strips, phone chargers, toilet paper, tools, etc.

A clear container allows you to see inside. Keep similar things together when you’re packing boxes. Bookends belong with books, light bulbs with lamps, and extension cords with appliances. You don’t want to be running all over the new house when unpacking to find different parts of the same sets.

Attach small, loose parts to the item they belong to with tape or in small envelopes — picture hooks with pictures, shelf brackets with a bookcase, a special wrench, and bolts with the wall unit.

Tape larger corresponding items (such as power cords) to the underside or back of the item. It is also helpful to have an “odds and ends” box with cables, cords, parts, pieces, brackets, or nails that are removed from any items of furniture. Mark this box to make it easy to find on moving day.

Moving Tricks

  • Wrap your delicate items (dishes, glasses, lamps, etc.) in clothing or towels to save on bubble wrap. For extra padding, pack your glasses and stemware in clean socks.
  • Clean your old home ahead of time (the inside of kitchen cupboards, the oven, windows, etc.), and if possible, vacuum each room as movers empty it. You’ll thank yourself later.
  • Fill luggage and duffle bags with clothing, sheets, towels, and paper goods to save on boxes.
  • Safeguard highly-valued items. Check your homeowner’s insurance to see how you are covered during the move, and if you need additional insurance from the mover. Also, find out what paperwork you might need to file a claim in case of loss.
  • Keep important papers with you such as birth certificates, school records, current bills, phone lists, closing papers, realtor info, maps, and more. Don’t leave these with the mover. Keep them with you!
  • Pack an overnight bag with the essentials, especially if you’re driving a far distance to your new home.

 Self-Storage Saves the Day!

Often when moving homes, the timing is a little off. Maybe your lease is up in your old apartment and your new home isn’t ready to move into yet.Or maybe you’re still selling your old home and you need to clear out the rooms for realtor showings. A self-storage unit is an easy, secure, and inexpensive option for storing your belongings. The Storage Inn offers 45 different storage unit sizes located in a clean, secure family-owned facility. We even have a resident security manager! It’s a great option for keeping your stuff safe and organized. 

When moving, we often find things we never use that take up space, but we just can’t let them go. Storage units help us hold on to these dear possessions. You can rent spaces as small as closets at your local storage facility. The Storage Inn also offers a free moving truck rental for local moves as well as vehicle storage for your bigger toys.

The Storage Inn is committed to making your moving day as easy as possible. Call or stop in for great prices on storage space, packing supplies, and truck and van rentals. Happy Moving!!!